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The Fear of Risk Taking

As I mentioned in earlier posts, I’ve been on a new life chapter and listening to some well-known authors of self-help and motivational books. I think a part of me allowed the fear of risk taking hinder the growth potential that is within each of us. I’m not afraid of no’s, in fact, the worse thing that someone can say when you present them with a yes or no question, is the answer that is contrary to what you would have liked it to be. I believe in asking the question, even when I don’t get the answer that I wanted. It gives me an opportunity to make adjustments in order to get the desired outcome. Sometimes, that takes many tries. As with many other events in life, learning for the first time or relearning things about yourself teaches you things you’ve long since forgotten. You must always be growing.

Until tomorrow, if you want to chat me up, follow me on Facebook @woodlandsgoldwiser , on Twitter @IamGinaOlson or on Instagram @HoustonGoldwiser or visit me in person at 24910 Kuykendahl Rd., Tomball, TX 77375

The Big Day Is Getting Closer

I have been making sure that I tell everyone what I’m doing, not only because I’m super excited about it, but because I need to be held accountable. There’s also, albeit ever so slight, a chance that it’ll be the last things I do. I firmly believe that if it’s my time to go, then God is going to take me whenever, wherever and in whatever way he chooses. So, I choose to go skydiving! I choose it mainly because there are some fears that I just have to get past and what better way than to live one of the ultimate fears that most people have, falling.

For as long as there’s been recorded history, there has been a fixation to climb mountains or volcanoes to reach a closeness to the gods. Juxtapose that with sacrifices made to the gods by throwing people INTO volcanoes and off high points. Some felt that it was noble for them to be sacrificed…Seriously….No! Others were coerced, threatened or ultimately forced once the animals were no longer strong enough to please the gods. Such an interesting place we come from and thank goodness the civilized world no longer does that, but that doesn’t mean it’s no longer done!

Now, I’m doing it for purely selfish reasons: I’m an adrenaline junky and every time I think about what I’m going to be doing in just a few days, I can’t help but to smile, very big! So, come Monday, I want you to visit my http://www.facebook.com/goldwiserwoodlands  page and stay tuned for my video. I’m sure it won’t be glamorous, but it’s going to amazing!

I’m Going to Fall From the Sky

Ok, my now infamous jump is happening in less than two weeks and I’m super stoked about it! I’ve been telling everyone I can that this is going to happen and there will be video uploaded for all to see. I have heard the fear from my son where he started with “Can I go with you?” to “Are you sure that you want to tempt God on a Sunday?” What I can say is this, I have no idea what’s going to happen except that I’m going to jump out of a perfectly good plane and do some tricks in the air as I fall down to earth.

I have done this before, but it’s been a minute. The way I look at this is if it’s my time to go, then it’s my time to go. You never know what’s going to happen from one day to the next and restricting yourself because someone else is concerned is not a good reason to stop you from doing what you want. Is it dangerous? Sure, if the parachute doesn’t open, it’s deadly. Like I said, I have done this before and the feeling is exhilarating and unlike anything else you can experience! So, stay tuned to my Facebook page for the video to be uploaded. Oh yeah, say a prayer and wish me luck!

Until tomorrow, if you want to chat me up, follow me on Facebook @woodlandsgoldwiser , on Twitter @IamGinaOlson or on Instagram @HoustonGoldwiser or visit me in person at 24910 Kuykendahl Rd., Tomball, TX 77375.

The Prevalence of Amethyst

Despite its prevalence, amethyst has been one of the world’s most revered stones for many centuries. Found in as many places as Brazil, Bolivia, Mexico, Africa, Canada, Russia, USA and Europe, this stone has a rich history of astonishing civilizations with its stunning, saturated beauty. While the Neolithic people in Europe it as a mere decorative emblem around 25,000 B.C., Ancient Greeks and Romans used amethyst in several ways from beads in jewelry to amulets. These ancient civilizations placed a high value in this stone. Their belief was that the amethyst crystal meaning was synonymous with luxury. As such, it was highlighted as part of their crowns, scepters and rings. Christian bishops once wore amethyst jewelry in the form of a ring. Its color was meant to symbolize royalty and an allegiance to Christ. Members of the Catholic clergy wore amethyst stone in their crosses because their amethyst meaning was one of piety and celibacy. It is even thought that the breast plate of the high priest of Israel was adorned with an amethyst as its ninth stone. It’s said that there were ten stones upon which the names of the tribes of Israel were engraved, and amethyst is believed to have been one of such stones.

Until tomorrow, if you want to chat me up, follow me on Facebook @woodlandsgoldwiser , on Twitter @IamGinaOlson or on Instagram @HoustonGoldwiser or visit me in person at 24910 Kuykendahl Rd., Tomball, TX 77375.

Valentine’s Day Isn’t What You Think It Is

Valentine’s Day is a time to celebrate romance and love and kissy-face fealty. But the origins of this festival of candy and cupids are actually dark, bloody — and a bit muddled.

Valentine’s Day is a time to celebrate romance and love and kissy-face fealty. But the origins of this festival of candy and cupids are actually dark, bloody — and a bit muddled.

Though no one has pinpointed the exact origin of the holiday, one good place to start is ancient Rome, where men hit on women by, well, hitting them.

Those Wild And Crazy Romans

From Feb. 13 to 15, the Romans celebrated the feast of Lupercalia. The men sacrificed a goat and a dog, then whipped women with the hides of the animals they had just slain.

The Roman romantics “were drunk. They were naked,” says Noel Lenski, a historian at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Young women would actually line up for the men to hit them, Lenski says. They believed this would make them fertile.

The brutal fete included a matchmaking lottery, in which young men drew the names of women from a jar. The couple would then be, um, coupled up for the duration of the festival — or longer, if the match was right.

The ancient Romans may also be responsible for the name of our modern day of love. Emperor Claudius II executed two men — both named Valentine — on Feb. 14 of different years in the 3rd century A.D. Their martyrdom was honored by the Catholic Church with the celebration of St. Valentine’s Day.

Later, Pope Gelasius I muddled things in the 5th century by combining St. Valentine’s Day with Lupercalia to expel the pagan rituals. But the festival was more of a theatrical interpretation of what it had once been. Lenski adds, “It was a little more of a drunken revel, but the Christians put clothes back on it. That didn’t stop it from being a day of fertility and love.”

Though no one has pinpointed the exact origin of the holiday, one good place to start is ancient Rome, where men hit on women by, well, hitting them.

Those Wild And Crazy Romans

From Feb. 13 to 15, the Romans celebrated the feast of Lupercalia. The men sacrificed a goat and a dog, then whipped women with the hides of the animals they had just slain.

The Roman romantics “were drunk. They were naked,” says Noel Lenski, a historian at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Young women would actually line up for the men to hit them, Lenski says. They believed this would make them fertile.

The brutal fete included a matchmaking lottery, in which young men drew the names of women from a jar. The couple would then be, um, coupled up for the duration of the festival — or longer, if the match was right.

The ancient Romans may also be responsible for the name of our modern day of love. Emperor Claudius II executed two men — both named Valentine — on Feb. 14 of different years in the 3rd century A.D. Their martyrdom was honored by the Catholic Church with the celebration of St. Valentine’s Day.

Later, Pope Gelasius I muddled things in the 5th century by combining St. Valentine’s Day with Lupercalia to expel the pagan rituals. But the festival was more of a theatrical interpretation of what it had once been. Lenski adds, “It was a little more of a drunken revel, but the Christians put clothes back on it. That didn’t stop it from being a day of fertility and love.”

Around the same time, the Normans celebrated Galatin’s Day. Galatin meant “lover of women.” That was likely confused with St. Valentine’s Day at some point, in part because they sound alike.

Why Get Her Jewelry?

For all of you men out there who are thinking of giving Valentine’s Day gifts here is a little hint, women prefer their hearts in gold and gemstones rather than boxes of chocolate.  For all of you women for whom I am speaking –try leaving subtle messages, “you ’re cutting back on your sugar intake” might be one you can use while you are pasting your favorite antique, vintage or modern heart jewelry on your fridge or leaving your tablets and phones open to photos around the house.

Jewelry doesn’t contain calories only carats or karats, won’t melt, but will sparkle in the sunshine and will endure with no expiration date. And, in the 18th and 19th centuries, it was a way to express emotions and intentions to loved ones.

Things haven’t changed that much.

Check back tomorrow! If you want to chat me up, follow me on Facebook @woodlandsgoldwiser , on Twitter @IamGinaOlson or on Instagram @HoustonGoldwiser or visit me in person at 24910 Kuykendahl Rd., Tomball, TX 77375.

How Garnet got its Name

The distinctive title Garnet is derived from the Latin name Granatum, a pomegranate, because of the resemblance the granular varieties of Garnet bears to the seeds of that fruit. Garnets vary in size from a grain of sand to the size of an apple. According to the Roman historian Pliny, the large dull-colored “Carbunculus of India” (a variety of Garnet) used to be hollowed out into vessels which would hold as much as a pint.

Garnets were used in the former Czechoslovakia as far back as the Bronze Age, and in Egypt more than five thousand years ago. They were used in Sumeria around 2100 B.C. and in Sweden between 1000 and 2000 B.C. They were also popular in ancient Greek and Roman civilizations. According to the Talmud, the only light on Noah’s ark was provided by a large Garnet. In Europe during the Middle Ages, Garnet was used to enhance truth, faith and constancy, and to dispel melancholy. As a Warrior’s Stone, Garnet served as a talisman in the Crusades for both the Christians and their Muslim enemies.

Garnet is said to have been one of the twelve stones in the Breastplate of the High Priest, and has been used as a sacred stone by the Native American Indians, the South American Indians, the Aztecs, the African tribal elders, and the Mayans. It acts with speed to expand one’s awareness due to the flash of lightening contained within, and enhances one’s internal fire to bring creative powers to implementation.

Garnets whose color suggested that of blood, were not only believed to confer invulnerability from wounds, but some Asiatic tribes launched garnets from their sling bows, and later as bullets, the principle being the blood-colored stone would inflict a deadlier wound than a leaden bullet. Such were used by the rebellious Hanzas, in 1892, during their hostilities with the British troops on the Kashmir frontier, and many of these precious missiles were preserved as curiosities.

Today, Garnet is not only worn ornamentally as a beautiful gem, but is used widely in industrial markets, from watch gears and scientific instruments to sandpaper and abrasives.

Types of Different Garnets

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Garnet is a powerful energizing and regenerative stone. It balances, strengthens and protects. While it is one of the most plentiful stones, it has several forms according to its mineral base, and in addition to all the healing and spiritual properties listed in this article, each type has additional properties listed on its specific page, along with its color energies, angels, and Feng Shui uses.

Almandine Garnet unites the energy of scarlet and red with the more muted, earthy overtones of brown. It is intimately tied to the Earth, and is a talisman of protection and unyielding strength, increasing willpower and resistance to all things negative. It aids circulation and all blood related issues. Associated with the First Chakra, it is a stone of physical love and relationships, and a spiritual stone of psychic protection.

Andradite Garnet is well-grounded in Earth’s elemental colors of green or olive, dark yellow, and black. A spiritual stone of higher thinking and self-empowerment, it is also a stone of strength and safety. Associated with the Base, Heart and Solar Plexus Chakras, it dissolves feelings of isolation or alienation and attracts intimate encounters with others.

Grossular Garnet exemplifies hope, empowerment, and all things nurturing from Mother Earth. It ranges in sunrise colors of yellow, gold, orange, scarlet and red, and the more popular shades of lush green. It is a stone of prosperity and abundance, encouraging gratitude and service to others. Associated with the Base, Sacral, Solar Plexus and Heart Chakras, Grossular Garnet is a deeply spiritual stone.

Pyrope Garnet is a mesmerizing stone, described as “living fire.” Its crystals range in color from rose red to deep crimson, including shades of scarlet, violet, and even indigo. It is a stone of inspiration, bestowing vitality and charisma, and assists in owning one’s gifts and abilities, and sharing them with others. It aligns the Base and Crown Chakras, and stimulates warmth and gentleness, unifying creative forces of the self.

Spessartine Garnet is one of the rarer varieties, known as the Garnet of the Sun. Its energy radiates in shades of dark gold, orange, scarlet and deep red. Crystals can be pale yellow if nearly pure, but are almost always mixed with Almandine Garnet. Spessartine activates the analytical processes of the mind, alleviating fears and providing confidence to change one’s life. It is associated with the Sacral and Solar Plexus Chakras, awakening creative energies and lending power to one’s will.

Uvarovite Garnet is emerald green in color, the only consistently green Garnet. It forms in small, uniform crystals and is rare, most often found in its drusy form, a natural surface coating of tiny sparkling crystals covering a rock, sometimes made into beautiful jewelry. It promotes prosperity and wealth, and assists one in learning to joyfully accept what is offered by the Universe. It stimulates the Heart Chakra and enhances spiritual relationships. This is a calm and peaceful stone.

Your MLK List of Things to do This Weekend

Find the perfect things to do in Houston MLK Weekend with our Houston Weekend Guide for Friday, January 18 to MLK Day, Monday, January 21, 2019. 

Cheer on athletes competing in the annual Chevron Houston Marathon; catch a hilarious, Tony Award-winning musical; don your cozy onesie for a bar crawl down Washington Avenue; honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. at a variety of celebrations around town; watch Boyz II Men team up with the Houston Symphony and more.  

Check below to find great things happening around Houston this weekend, from Friday, January 18 to MLK Day, Monday, January 21, 2019.

Things to Do All MLK Weekend

  • Midday Kidcuts with Birds Barbershop’s “Earlybird” Special | $5 Off | Daily – Snag a great coif for your favorite kiddos and save $5 per haircut for ages 10 and under at Birds Barbershop in The Heights on Mondays through Thursdays in January 2019. Clients can walk in during regular business hours, schedule a same-day appointment via the Birds Booking app, or call ahead. 10am to 3pm each day.
  • The Book of Mormon at Hobby Center for the Performing Arts | Thursday to Sunday – Don’t miss your chance to see the nine-time Tony Award-winning musical, The Book of Mormon when the touring cast performs a six-day stretch of the hilarious show at Houston’s Hobby Center. Tickets start at $80. Showtimes vary.
  • Cirque du Soleil’s Luzia at Sam Houston Race Park | Thursday to Sunday – Watch an enchanting performance of Cirque du Soleil‘s Luzia, which takes audiences on an imaginary journey through Mexico with stunning costumes and breathtaking acrobatics at Sam Houston Race Park. Tickets start at $45. Showtimes vary.
  • 10th Annual Yaga’s Chili Quest & Beer Fest | Friday and Saturday – Roll up your sleeves and come hungry to the tenth annual, 2-day Chili Quest & Beer Fest in Galveston. Start the party at Yaga’s Cafe on Friday, then make your way to several tasty events along the Historic Strand on Saturday. Expect chili samples, beer tastings, live music, a washers tournament, a 5K fun run, a margarita contest, and shopping. Tickets start at $12. Times vary.
  • International Gem & Jewelry Show at NRG Center | Friday to Sunday – Admire a dazzling collection of gemstones, fine jewelry, engagement rings and bands, designer watches, pearls, beads, accessories, and minerals during the International Gem & Jewelry Show at NRG Center. $6. Times vary.
  • 4th Annual Alley All New Festival at Alley Theatre | Friday to Sunday – Check out a full lineup of readings, workshop performances, parties, and the world premiere of The Carpenter, during the fourth annual Alley All New Festival at Alley Theatre. Prices and times vary.
  • The Oak Ridge Boys at The Grand 1894 Opera House | Friday to Sunday – Hear the four-part harmonies of The Oak Ridge Boys as they perform a slew of country hits at The Grand 1894 Opera House in Galveston. Tickets start at $37. Times vary.

Friday, January 18, 2019

  • 23rd Annual Foley Gardere MLK Jr. Oratory Competition at Antioch Missionary Baptist Church | FREE – Cheer on talented students as they compete in the 23rd Annual Foley Gardere MLK Jr. Oratory Competition, which challenges participants to present a short speech in response to the question, “What would Dr. King say to the children of today’s world?”. 10am.
  • Funfetti Fridays on The ICE at Discovery Green – Skate around The ICE at Discovery Green while jamming out to a colorful light show with beats from DJ Mohawk Steve during Funfetti Fridays. Tickets are $11. Skate rentals cost $4. 7pm to 9pm.
  • Bowie: Art Market & Movie Nights at Karbach Brewing Co | No Cover – Celebrate David Bowie with a free screening of his 1986 film, Labyrinth, accompanied by a themed art market at Karbach Brewing Co. 5pm to 10pm.
  • Onesie Bar Crawl on Washington Ave  Get cozy in your favorite pajamas and make your way through several bars along Washington Avenue at this onesie-themed bar crawl. Bars will offer drink specials throughout the event and include Kung Fu Saloon, Clutch Bar Houston, Concrete Cowboy and more. Tickets are $10 in advance; $25 at the door, plus fees. 6pm.
  • Houston Marathon Kickoff Party featuring The Nirvana Experience & Weezhur at House of Blues – Sing and dance to all your favorite throwback songs by Nirvana and Weezer during a cover band concert at House of Blues to kick off the marathon weekend. $12. 7pm.
  • Florencia en el Amazonas at Wortham Theater Center – Bask in the sounds of Florencia en el Amazonas, an epic opera that tells the tale of a talented singer who ventures home to South America after a 20-year stretch and finds her long-lost love. Tickets start at $25. 7:30pm.
  • Turkish Music Festival at Asia Society Texas Center  Experience an evening of Turkish music and traditions at this annual festival hosted by the Asia Society Texas Center. The concert will feature Grammy-nominated composer and musician Mehmet Ali Şanlıkol, along with the San Francisco-based Del Sol String Quartet. Tickets cost $30 for non-members; $20 for members. 7:30pm to 10pm.
  • Boyz II Men & The Houston Symphony in Concert at Jones Hall – Hear a mesmerizing performance by the four-time Grammy-winning R&B trio, Boyz II Men, when they team up with the Houston Symphony for a special show at Jones Hall. Chelsea Tipton II will conduct the concert. Tickets start at $35. 7:30pm.
  • Hannah Kirby’s Acoustic Concert at McGonigel’s Mucky Duck – Hannah Kirby, award-winning Texas songwriter and finalist on NBC’s The Voice, joins guitarist Brad Thompson (2018 Fort Worth Star-Telegram musician of the year) to give Houstonians an intimate, acoustic blues-rock performance. Tickets are $20. 9:30pm.

Saturday, January 19, 2019

  • Urban Harvest Farmers Market | No Cover – Shop for produce and prepared foods at the Urban Harvest Farmers Market at its new location off of Buffalo Speedway. 8am to noon.
  • Houston Center for Photography Workshop at Levy Park | FREE – Learn the basics of photography every first and third Saturday of the month at Levy Park. 9am to 10:30am.
  • Bubbles, Bibs, & Brunch Bash at Pico’s – Join Dress for Success Houston for a delicious brunch featuring bites from the city’s hottest eateries at Pico’s Restaurant in Upper Kirby following the We Are Houston 5K. Participating restaurants include Poitin, Hungry’s, Alice Blue, River Oaks Donuts, and more. Tickets start at $40. 9:30am to 12:30pm.
  • MLK Youth Parade in Midtown Houston | FREE – Watch or march in Midtown’s 13th Annual MLK Youth Parade, which features 10 parade floats and 20 marching bands. Noon to 1:30pm.
  • Pacquiao vs. Broner Watch Party at La Cantina, by La Calle – Root for your pick in one of the season’s biggest boxing matches when Manny Pacquiao returns to the U.S. after two years to take on Adrien Broner. La Cantina is offering reserved seating for an additional fee and plenty of drink specials throughout the night. Tickets start at $10. 6pm.
  • Bayou City Burlesque Circus Festival at Warehouse Live – Marvel at high-flying acrobats, death-defying sideshows, extraordinary burlesque, fantastical jugglers, and other glamorous acts at the world-renowned Bayou City Burlesque Circus Festival. Tickets start at $25. 7pm to 11pm.
  • Houston Rockets vs. Los Angeles Lakers at Toyota Center – Cheer loud for the Rockets when they hit the court to play the Lakers at Toyota Center. Ticket prices are TBA. 7:30pm.
  • Jazzmeia Horn Septet at Wortham Center – Take a seat for a show-stopping concert by Texas-born vocalist Jazzmeia Horn, who will perform in support of her debut recording on Concord’s Prestige label, A Social Call, at the Wortham Theater Center.Tickets start at $37.50. 8pm.
  • El Ten Eleven, Joan of Arc in Concert at White Oak Music Hall – Jam out to the music of post-rock duo El Ten Eleven as they perform a selection of songs for audiences at White Oak Music Hall, alongside fellow indie-rockers Joan of Arc. Tickets are $15 in advance; $17 at the door, plus fees. 8pm.
  • Demetri Martin at House of Blues – Burst out laughing during a stand-up show by award-winning comedian Demetri Martin at House of Blues in Downtown. Tickets are $39.75. 8pm.
  • Los Tucanes De Tijuana in Concert at Arena Theatre – Dance along to music by the popular Mexican norteño band, Los Tucanes De Tijuana, when they bring their beats to Houston’s Arena Theatre. Tickets start at $65. 8:30pm.
  • Amen Dunes in Concert at Rockefellers – Listen to the dynamic soundscapes and intimate lyrics of Amen Dunes as he takes the stage at Rockefellers following his 2018 release, Freedom. Tickets start at $15. 9pm.

Sunday, January 20, 2019

  • Chevron Houston Marathon – Volunteer, show your support, or join the runners as they compete in the Chevron Houston Marathon and Aramco Houston Half Marathon, which winds throughout the city, beginning and ending in Downtown. You must register for this event. 6:45am
  • Family Fun Day at The MATCH | FREE – Bring the kiddos to an afternoon of family-friendly fun in celebration of The Midtown Arts & Theater Center Houston’s (MATCH) fourth year in operation. You can enjoy character visits, balloon animals, a bounce house, kid-friendly concerts, and performances from Main Street Theater and Open Dance Project. 1pm to 4pm.
  • Watercolor Painting Classes at Honey Art Cafe  Learn how to paint abstract, modern, and minimalist aesthetics in this mini-watercolor painting class at Honey Art Cafe. Catzilla is the subject of this week’s family-friendly class. $35. 1pm.
  • MLK Battle of the Bands Competition at W.W. Thorne Stadium | FREE – Pick your favorite of more than 20 nationally acclaimed marching bands from high schools across the country in the 18th Annual MLK Battle of the Bands at W.W. Thorne Stadium. 4pm to 7pm.
  • Skating with the Stars at Discovery Green | FREE – Skate alongside skilled professionals when they take to The ICE at Discovery Green every Sunday evening throughout the winter season. 6pm to 6:45pm.
  • Wild Moccasins, with DEGA in Concert at Satellite Bar – Check out a concert by Houston’s own Wild Moccasins when they play a set alongside DEGA at Satellite Bar in the East End. You’ll hear music from their most recent album, Look Together. Tickets start at $10. 7pm.
  • Boss Life Awards & Ball 2019 at The Post Oak Hotel – Rub elbows with some of Houston’s most distinguished business women and men at the sixth annual Boss Life Awards and Ball in The Post Oak Hotel. Benefitting scholarship programs for high school graduates, the event will offer light bites and a cash bar. $150. 8pm.

MLK Day, Monday, January 21, 2019

  • MLK Day at Children’s Museum of Houston – Listen to uplifting words by Gardere’s oratory speech winner, march down Kid’s Hall in celebration of civil rights, hear the “I Have a Dream” speech and more at the Children’s Museum’s MLK Day Celebration. $5. 10am to 6pm.
  • 41st Annual Original MLK Day Parade & Celebration at Hermann Square | FREE – March in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. at the 41st Annual MLK Jr. Parade, which begins outside of Houston City Hall and is presented by The Black Heritage Society Organization. 10am.
  • 25th Annual MLK Grande Parade | FREE – Celebrate the life of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in this annual parade that meets near the HCC Central Campus. 10am.
  • MLK Day Audio Installation at Rothko Chapel | FREE – Listen to various speeches that MLK gave throughout his life with this interactive installation at Rothko Chapel. 11am, 1pm, 3pm, and 5pm.
  • Margarita Monday at El Big Bad | No Cover – Score half-off house margaritas from El Big Bad downtown every Monday evening. Menu items vary. 4pm.
  • Monday Steak Dinner at Bar Boheme | No Cover – Head to Bar Boheme and take advantage of a special edition of their Monday Steak Night, where you can enjoy a complimentary steak dinner with the purchase of a bottle of wine. Dinner includes a 7-ounce New York strip, along with curried mashed potatoes and sauteed spinach. If you don’t want a bottle of wine, the steak dinners are $9 or $12 with a glass of wine. 4pm.
  • Bingo in the Biergarten at Karbach Brewing Co | No Cover – Try your luck at a round of bingo while sipping craft brews on the patio at the family-friendly Karbach Brewing Co. 6pm to 8pm.

Until tomorrow, if you want to chat me up, follow me on Facebook @woodlandsgoldwiser , on Twitter @IamGinaOlson or on Instagram @HoustonGoldwiser or visit me in person at 24910 Kuykendahl Rd., Tomball, TX 77375.

Garnet in Ancient Lore and Legend

Garnets were employed as inlaid stones in Celtic and Anglo-Saxon jewelry. Garnets the color of fire were also called Carbuncles (from fire-coals), and the Hebrew name for the carbuncle was Bareketh (flashing stone) or Barak (lightning). It was a stone in the breastplate of the High Priest. Eastern legends assert that a carbuncle was suspended by Noah, in the Ark, to diffuse light. The Greeks called the carbuncle the Lamp Stone and it was said, if hung around the neck, to give the power of seeing in the dark. 

Greek mythology speaks of Garnet as a stone that can, through divine influence, heal emotional rifts between lovers.

A Warrior’s Stone, Garnet served as a talisman in the Crusades for both the Christians and their Muslim enemies. The Merovingians brought garnets from faraway Ceylon (Sri Lanka) through the Silk Road, combining it with amber from the Baltic to create magnificent jewels. Since these two stones balanced each other, one warm, one cold, some see the source of the Frankish civilization in this combination, the amber tempering the warrior-like fieriness of the Germanic people.

Low libido and sexual disorders were credited to be relieved by the application of Garnet directly to the genital organs. Princess Palatine discovered her husband, the brother of King Louis XIV, applying garnets on his body in this way. Though he asked her not to reveal this to anyone, she instead told the whole court and wrote about it in her many famous letters. 

Garnet is a conqueror’s stone. Legend has it that a garnet ornamented Don Juan’s ring. 

The well-formed image of a lion, if engraved on a garnet, will cure the wearer of all diseases, protect and preserve his honor and health, and guard him from all perils in traveling.

Some Asiatic tribes used red garnets as bullets for sling bows because they pierced their victims quickly and were well hidden when they mingled with the blood. At other times they were placed in wounds to encourage clotting of the blood. The tribes continued to use them later as bullets in firearms, assuming the blood-colored stone would inflict a more deadly wound than a leaden bullet. Such were used by the rebellious Hanzas, in 1892, during their hostilities with the British troops on the Kashmir frontier, and many of these precious missiles were preserved as curiosities.

Garnet’s Emotional Healing Energy

Garnet provides a protective influence and a calming stable vitality during use. It is thought to heal emotional problems. Placed under a pillow, Garnet is reputed to alleviate bad dreams. Medicine men used it to cure mental depression. 

Garnet is useful to have in a crisis, particularly in situations where there seems to be no way out or where life has fragmented. It fortifies, activates, and strengthens the survival instinct, bringing courage and hope into those situations. Crisis is turned into challenge under Garnet’s influence and promotes mutual assistance in times of trouble. 

Garnet can act as a strong help to balance the energy system, stimulate desires and uplift your attitude. As a balancer stone, Garnet can prevent fears of insecurity and even money losses. They’re lucky stones: lucky for love, success, and for goals. Use Garnet to increase your positivity and popularity, thus enhancing your personal self-esteem. As an energy stone, it can encourage success in business and business relationships. It is a wonderful executive gem, especially for women. Square cut garnets are particularly useful in bringing success in business matters.

Garnet has even been credited with aiding widows in finding a new husband. After mourning for too long, Garnet helps to regain the spirit, calming sadness and emotional pain, helping those who have gone through great despair get back on their feet and become seductive again. Perhaps the same could be true for widowers as well.