Mardi Gras Day in New Orleans

That’s the call to riders dispensing beads and “throws” from the elaborate floats of Mardi Gras. The name of the holiday’s misleading. It’s about a month or so of parties named for just one day, Fat Tuesday, the last day before Lent. But Mardi Gras is more in New Orleans. No one does Carnival like the Crescent City. Beginning on Twelfth Night, Jan. 6, the city is obsessed with eating, costuming, bead-tossing and parading that increases in intensity as Ash Wednesday nears. On the weekends leading up to Fat Tuesday, parades roll all over town. Spectators gasp at the colossal Endymion floats and delight in the social satire of Krewe d’Etat’s. There are new traditions like Chewbacchus with its Star Wars-inspired tomfoolery and ages old ones such as Zulu and Rex. Visitors are encouraged to explore New Orleans Mardi Gras traditions. To eat oysters and king cake, watch parades roll down St. Charles Avenue and tag along with marching krewes as they wind their way into the Quarter from New Orleans historic neighborhoods.

The biggest parades in New Orleans happen on Mardi Gras day, which is the Tuesday before Lent begins, 47 days before Easter. This date can fall anywhere from the 3rd February through to 10th March.

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The main Mardi Gras parades happen on the Tuesday itself, with a good many other parades in the week leading up to Mardi Gras day itself.

Contrary to public perception, Mardi Gras is a family celebration. Those of us who grew up in New Orleans feel guilty once our children have grown up and we continue going to every parade, because we used to use “taking the children” as our excuse! Bring big bags (even large garbage bags!) to hold all of the stuff they will catch. Throws often include toys, stuffed animals, beads and more.

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The only place you should avoid with kids is the French Quarter (where no full-size parades pass anyway). We recommend seeing the parades when they begin on St. Charles Avenue near Napoleon, since parades can last until 11 p.m. near the end of the route. The Garden District portion of St. Charles is a family area where you will see many families staking out their parade watching position, having picnics, playing ball, and having fun under the beautiful oak trees. You don’t have to worry about the streetcars, as they stop running in this area during Mardi Gras.

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You may also want to consider taking your kids to the parades in the suburban areas like Metairie, which is only 10 minutes away from New Orleans. Metairie’s Caesar parade, the Saturday before Mardi Gras weekend, is the parade Disneyworld features on Mardi Gras day. Kids love it!

Happy Mardi Gras!!!

(Information from mardigrasneworleans.com)

MARCHING CLUBS AND DANCE TROUPES

What would Mardi Gras be without its parades? And what would Mardi Gras parades be without it sassy, sequined, irreverent dance troupes and marching clubs? In the past few years, marching groups have been popping up all over. It’s a great way to be a part of Mardi Gras without the expense of joining a big krewe. The best of the best groups like to do it up big. Big costumes, big color, big hair, big glitter. Watch for these great groups on the parade route:


Here are just a few of the many groups:

Amazons – To represent a certain “ferocity of spirit and soul,” the Amazons, some of whom are cancer survivors, don’t smile on their parade route. They don warrior tunics and breast armor, and, along with the Scythians (their male supporters), they perform formations during marches with their swords.

Amelia EarHawts Cabin Krewe – This dance group was founded in in 2014, inspired by the tragic female aviation pioneer who spent some of her last days at Lakefront Airport in New Orleans. They take off down the street in old-time flight attendant outfits.

Bearded Oysters – No, New Orleans hasn’t got to the point where we have realoysters dancing down the street, but we do have this girls’ troupe that’s more into shaking and wooing than any kind of stilted choreography. Men are also involved, dressed up as chefs and called “Oyster Shuckers.”

Black Storyville Baby Dolls – Founded in 2014,this group throws black roses to honor the women who costumed and paraded in the African-American part of New Orleans’ red-light district in 1912. They also throw cigars which the first dolls smoked openly in public.Joining them on the route are the “Basin Street Characters.”

Big Easy Rollergirls – What Fat Tuesday parade would be complete without New Orleans’ only professional roller derby team? The girls are ready to put on a jam – and maybe even challenge you to a match race!

Crescent City Dames – Since 2012, the Crescent City Dames have created their own hand-beaded corsets. In the past, themes have included “Women of Power,” “The Holidays” and “Toasting the Cocktail.” They sashay annually on theFriday before Mardi Gras in the French Quarter.

The Dance Connection – This 40+ year old group’s motto is “UNITY…Though dance and Friendship.” Established in 1979, TDC was the first troupe to use a mobile sound system.

Divine Jewels of Covington – This marching group recycles Mardi Gras beads in an interesting way – they use them to make elaborately decorated bustiers and other accoutrements. The guys who accompany the Jewels are called Jokers. They wear top hats and dress in black with an accent color matching their Jewel. The group was founded in 2018 and currently has 44 Jewels and 27 Jokers. Come see them in the French Quarter the Friday before Mardi Gras.

The Half-Fast Walking Club ­–  The best known marching group in New Orleans might just be The Half-Fast Walking Club, founded by legendary clarinetist Pete Fountain and his friends in 1961. Although Pete passed away in 2016, his band of merry men continue on, following a route, unchanged since the mid-1970s. They begin at 7 a.m. on Mardi Gras morning at Commander’s Palace in the Garden District,  “toot and scoot”  downtown on St. Charles Avenue and, after a brief interlude on Canal Street, turn onto Bourbon Street, wind around the Quarter, and eventually end up at the Monteleone Hotel.

Krewe of the Rolling Elvi – This group has two goals. Honor the memory of the King and entertain parade revelers. They succeed on both levels. Dozens of sequin clad men riding around on scooters is a site you don’t want to miss.

Jailhouse Rockers – This krewe is a spin-off of the popular Krewe of the Rolling Elvi. Thank you, thank you, thank you very much for applauding them on the parade route.

Laissez Boys – They don’t dance or march but, in the true spirit of Mardi Gras this krewe rolls. Watch for their motorized Lazy Boys on the parade route. You’ll have a new appreciation for that beat-up recliner in your parents living room. In fact, you’ll find yourself mumbling, “I need one of those.”

Muff-a-Lottas – Named after New Orleans’ famous sandwich the muffuletta, this groupdresses like feisty 1950s diner waitresses in saddle shoes and short skirts. They only dance to oldies with a New Orleans connection – tunes from Ernie K Doe, Irma Thomas, Fats Domino, The Dixie Cups, Shirley Ellis, and so on! They throw scarves, cat-eye sunglasses and special Muff-A-Lotta beads.


NOLA Showgirls –Those ostrich-feather fans belong to the NOLA Showgirls who add a little Las Vegas glamour to parade route (their Sunset Strip.)They’ve appeared in several TV shows, movies and commercials.


Red Beans – The first bean krewe was founded in 2008 and paraded for the first time in 2009. The 150 krewe members march on “the best Monday of the year,” Lundi Gras, at 2 p.m through the Marigny and Treme where they meet the Dead Beans.They are typically joined by thousands of “unofficial” paraders  in their own bean suits.

Roux La La – Founded in 2009, this group get its name from the roux (a base for gumbo). According to their website, they are “New Orleans’ official swamp steppin’, booty shakin’, booze guzzlin’, pot stirrin’, GLITTER IN YOUR FACE female dance troupe. Their aim is to “better our community one sequin at a time.”

Sirens of New Orleans – Since 2010, the dancing mermaids and the Sailor Corp have danced the entire route of every parade they’ve been in, tossing their signature decorated “message in a bottle.”

The Streetcar Strutters – This group rolled down St. Charles Avenue for the first time in 2017. Their group’s green and gold costumes feature hand-decorated conductor caps.

TAP DAT – Established in 2008, TAP DAT wears black and gold costumes and tap dances their way into Mardi Gras history every year.

(Information from mardigrasneworleans.com)


MARDI GRAS BEADS AND THROWS

So what are “throws?” Well, they are exactly what they sound like – items that krewe members on floats throw to parade-goers as the floats pass by! Throws often include doubloons, beads, cups, homemade trinkets, toys and more! 

The throwing of trinkets to the crowds was started in the early 1870s by the Twelfth Night Revelers, and is a time-honored expectation for young and old alike.

In 1884, Rex started using medallions instead of trinkets. These medallions are represented by today’s doubloons, aluminum and anodized in many different colors. They depict the parade theme on one side and the Krewe’s emblem on the other. They have become collectors items.

In the Bacchus parade, the King’s float throws doubloons with the image of the celebrity king on one side of the doubloon. If you’re lucky enough to catch one, hold onto it!

The most prized throws are the krewe’s “signature throws.” Zulu has it famous coconuts and many other krewes offer hand-decorated items including Muses shoes, Nyx purses, Alla Genie lamps, Carrollton shrimp boots and the list goes on. Most krewes have medallion beads that feature that year’s theme.

Other popular throws include cups (otherwise known as New Orleans dinnerware), long pearl beads and stuffed animals. Some throws even light up.

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Be warned! If you’re at your first parade and reach down to pick up a doubloon with your hand, your fingers may never be the same! Many stomp on doubloons in their rush to claim them.

Hint: If you’re standing next to a bunch of old grandmothers dressed in high heels and playboy bunny outfits, don’t think your chances are any better. They may be old, but they have fast feet and the spikes on those heels – ouch! Hahaha!

Happy Mardi Gras!!!

(Information from mardigrasneworleans.com)

MARDI GRAS INDIANS – PART 3

Parade formation and Protocol

The Mardi Gras Indians play various traditional roles. Many blocks ahead of the Indians are plain clothed informants keeping an eye out for any danger. The procession begins with “spyboys,” dressed in light “running suits” that allow them the freedom to move quickly in case of emergency. Next comes the “first flag,” an ornately dressed Indian carrying a token tribe flag. Closest to the “Big Chief” is the “Wildman” who usually carries a symbolic weapon. Finally, there is the “Big Chief.” The “Big Chief” decides where to go and which tribes to meet (or ignore). The entire group is followed by percussionists and revelers.

During the march, the Indians dance and sing traditional songs particular to their gang. They use hodgepodge languages loosely based on different African dialects. The “Big Chief” decides where the group will parade; the parade route is different each time. When two tribes come across each other, they either pass by or meet for a symbolic fight. Each tribe lines up and the “Big Chiefs” taunt each other about their suits and their tribes. The drum beats of the two tribes intertwine, and the face off is complete. Both tribes continue on their way.[

Violence

In the early days of the Indians, Mardi Gras was a day of both reveling and bloodshed. “Masking” and parading was a time to settle grudges. This part of Mardi Gras Indian history is immortalized in James Sugar Boy Crawford’s song, “Jock O Mo” (better known and often covered as “Iko Iko“), based on their taunting chants. However, in the late 1960s, Allison Montana, “Chief of Chiefs”, fought to end violence between the Mardi Gras Indian Tribes.  He said, “I was going to make them stop fighting with the gun and the knife and start fighting with the needle and thread.” Today, the Mardi Gras Indians are not plagued by violence; instead they base their fights over the “prettiness” of their suits.

Long ago, Mardi Gras was a violent day for many Mardi Gras Indians. It was a day often used to settle scores. The police were often unable to intervene due to the general confusion surrounding Mardi Gras events in the city, when the streets were crowded and everyone was masked. This kept many families away from the “parade,” and created much worry and concern for a mothers whose children wanted to join the Indians.

Today when two Mardi Gras Indian tribes pass one another, you will see a living theater of art and culture. Each tribe’s style and dress is on display in a friendly but competitive manner. They compare one another’s art and craftsmanship.

The Big Chiefs of two different tribes start with a song/chant, ceremonial dance, and threatening challenge to “Humba”. The Big Chief’s demand that the other Chief bows and pays respect. The retort is a whoop and equally impressive song and war dance with the reply, “Me no Humba, YOU Humba!”

Although there was a history of violence, many now choose to keep this celebration friendly. Each Big Chief will eventually stand back and, with a theatrical display of self-confidence, acknowledge the artistry and craftsmanship of the other chief’s suit.

Before the progression can continue, the two Big Chiefs will often comment privately to one another, “Looking good, baby, looking good!”

The good news is Mardi Gras day is no longer a day to “settle scores” among the Mardi Gras Indians. Now that the tradition and practice for the Indians to compare their tribal song, dance and dress with other tribes as they meet that day, violence is a thing of the past. The Mardi Gras Indian has invested thousands of hours and dollars in the creation of his suit, and will not run the risk of ruining it in a fight. This tradition, rich with folk art and history, is now appreciated by museums and historical societies around the world. It is a remarkable and welcome change from the past.

(Information from mardigrasneworleans.com)

MARDI GRAS INDIANS – PART 2

Mardi Gras Indians are black carnival revelers in New Orleans, Louisiana, who dress up for Mardi Gras in suits influenced by Native American ceremonial apparel.

History

Mardi Gras Indians have been parading in New Orleans at least since the mid-19th century, possibly before. The history of the Mardi Gras Indians is shrouded in mystery and folklore.

Congo Square

In 1740, New Orleans’ Congo Square was a cultural center for African music and dance. New Orleans was more liberal than many Southern cities, and on Sundays African slaves gathered to sing folk songs, play traditional music, and dance. The lively parties were recounted by a Northern observer as being “indescribable… Never will you see gayer countenances, demonstrations of more forgetfulness of the past and the future, and more entire abandonment to the joyous existence to the present movement.” The idea of letting loose and embracing traditional African music and dance is a backbone of the Mardi Gras Indians practice.[

Native American and African American encounters

As a major southern trade port, New Orleans became a cultural melting pot.

During the late 1740s and 1750s, many enslaved Africans fled to the bayous of Louisiana where they encountered Native Americans. Years later, after the Civil War, hundreds of freed slaves joined the U.S. Ninth Cavalry Regiment, also known as Buffalo Soldiers. The Buffalo Soldiers fought, killed, forced and aided the mass removal and relocation of the Plains Indians on the Western Frontier. After returning to New Orleans, many ex-soldiers joined popular Wild West Shows, most notably Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show. The show wintered in New Orleans from 1884 to 1885 and was hailed by the Daily Picayune as “the people’s choice”. There was at least one black cowboy in the show, and numerous black cowhands.

On Mardi Gras in 1885, fifty to sixty Plains Indians marched in native dress on the streets of New Orleans. Later that year, the first Mardi Gras Indian gang was formed; the tribe was named “The Creole Wild West” and was most likely composed of members of Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show, though the “Indian gangs” might predate their appearance in the parades.

(Information from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia )

MARDI GRAS INDIANS – PART 1

Mardi Gras is full of secrets, and the Mardi Gras Indians are as much a part of that secrecy as any other carnival organization. Their parade dates, times and routes are never published in advance, although they do tend to gather in the same areas every year.

The Mardi Gras Indians are comprised, in large part, of the African-American communities of New Orleans’s inner city. While these Indians have paraded for well over a century, their parade is perhaps the least recognized Mardi Gras tradition.

“Mardi Gras Indians–the parade most people don’t see. The ceremonial procession is loose, the parade is not scheduled for a particular time or route…that is up to the Big Chief.” – Larry Bannock

“Mardi Gras Indians are secretive because only certain people participated in masking–people with questionable character. In the old day, the Indians were violent. Indians would meet on Mardi Gras; it was a day to settle scores.” – Larry Bannock, Past President, New Orleans Mardi Gras Indian Council

Traditional Mardi Gras organizations form a “krewe.” A krewe often names their parade after a particular Roman or Greek mythological hero or god. The ranking structure of a Mardi Gras Krewe is a parody of royalty: King, Queen, Dukes, Knights and Captains, or some variation of that theme. Many of the more established krewes allow membership by invitation only.

Few in the ghetto felt they could ever participate in the typical New Orleans parade. Historically, slavery and racism were at the root of this cultural separation. The black neighborhoods in New Orleans gradually developed their own style of celebrating Mardi Gras. Their krewes are named for imaginary Indian tribes according to the streets of their ward or gang.

The Mardi Gras Indians named themselves after native Indians to pay them respect for their assistance in escaping the tyranny of slavery. It was often local Indians who accepted slaves into their society when they made a break for freedom. They have never forgotten this support.

Their organizations are called “tribes”. There are about 38 tribes. They range in size from half a dozen to several dozen members. The groups are largely independent, but a pair of umbrella organizations loosely coordinate the Uptown Indians and the Downtown Indians.

In addition to Mardi Gras Day, many of the tribes also parade on Saint Joseph’s Day (March 19) and the Sunday nearest to Saint Joseph’s Day (“Super Sunday”). Traditionally, these were the only times Mardi Gras Indians were seen in public in full regalia. The New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival began the practice of hiring tribes to appear at the Festival as well. In recent years it has become more common to see Mardi Gras Indians at other festivals and parades in the city.

Notwithstanding the popularity of such activities for tourists and residents alike, the phenomenon of the Mardi Gras Indians is said to reflect a vital musical history.

Suits

Mardi Gras Indian suits cost thousands of dollars in materials alone and can weigh upwards of one hundred pounds. A suit usually takes between six and nine months to plan and complete. Each Indian designs and creates his own suit; elaborate bead patches depict meaningful and symbolic scenes. Beads, feathers, and sequins are integral parts of a Mardi Gras Indian suit. Uptown New Orleans tribes tend to have more sculptural and abstract African-inspired suits; downtown tribes have more pictorial suits with heavy Native American influences.

(Information from mardigrasneworleans.com)


MARDI GRAS TRADITIONS

Mardi Gras is about music, parades, picnics, floats and excitement. It’s one big holiday in New Orleans!

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Revelers know to wear costumes or at least dress in purple, green, and gold, and adorn themselves with long beads caught from the floats of previous parades. You’ll see a lot of crazy costumes, kids with their families are everywhere, and both locals and visitors having a great time. Parade goers will sit on the ground, throw balls, play music, eat great food and watch the crowds walk by between parades. On Mardi Gras day, the majority of non-essential businesses are shut down because of the celebration.

Experienced revelers know to bring a large bag with them so they can haul away all the beads and trinkets they will catch from the parades!

MASKS

Whether they cover the wearer’s eyes or whole face, masks add an element of mystery and intrigue when worn, especially around this particular holiday in the city. It’s safe to say that masks are a popular Mardi Gras tradition.

When did the mask tradition start though, and why?

Masks have been worn by different societies for centuries. Some groups wear them for rituals, some for celebrations, and still others for the performing arts. Mardi Gras masks in particular originated in ritual celebrations. New Orleans has been celebrating Mardi Gras for hundreds of years, and is the largest masked party in North America.

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In the beginning, masks worn during Mardi Gras allowed wearers to escape society and class constraints. When wearing a mask, carnival goers were free to be whomever they wanted to be, and mingle with whatever class they desired to mingle with. However, they were also considered to be a diversion for poor people, and women who wore masks had their reputation questioned.

Today, everyone wears masks during Mardi Gras. In fact, float riders are required to wear masks by law. On Fat Tuesday, everyone is free to wear masks, adding to the excitement and magic of celebrations throughout the city.

(Information from mardigrasneworleans.com)

Kern Studios’ Mardi Gras World

Kern Studios Early Days

The early days of what has grown into Kern Studios started with Roy Kern, a local artist-turned-sign-painter who worked his way through the Depression by painting names and signs on the bows of freighters and barges.

Roy and his son Blaine built their first Mardi Gras float together on the back on a mule-drawn wagon in 1932. Unable to pay his mother’s medical bills, Blaine offered to paint a mural in the hospital, which caught the eye of a surgeon who was also the captain of a Mardi Gras Krewe. This captain invited Blaine to design and build floats for his Krewe, and Kern Studios was officially founded in its current form in 1947. One float led to another, and before long Blaine became the city’s leading parade designer and builder, working with Rex, Zulu and other legendary krewes.

Mr. Mardi Gras

Blaine Kern traveled throughout Europe to apprentice under the world’s leading float and costume makers. During several trips to Italy, France, and Spain, Blaine became inspired by the extravagant concepts and animation that marked the European style of float building.

He brought these ideas to New Orleans and developed the monumental scale and lavish ornamentation of today’s spectacular Mardi Gras floats. Blaine Kern was instrumental in the formative years of some of New Orleans’ biggest parades and “Super Krewes” and is still known as “Mr. Mardi Gras.”

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THE CREATION OF MARDI GRAS WORLD

After many requests for private tours of Kern Studios from people wanting a sneak-peak of Mardi Gras, the Kerns decided to open up the working studio to the public. In 1984, Mardi Gras World was created as a tourist attraction to provide visitors a behind-the-scenes look of our work. Widely successful, the attraction draws hundreds of thousands of visitors from all over the world each year.

The tour allows you to see firsthand what it takes to bring Mardi Gras to life year after year. Walk through the hard work and extensive planning that goes into this grand event when you tour Blaine Kern Studios, an operating workshop that has created breathtaking floats for Mardi Gras and other parades around the world since 1947.

On the tour, you’ll be paired up with a knowledgeable guide who takes the mask off of Mardi Gras. This all-access opportunity winds you through the massive studio, where artists and architects build Mardi Gras floats from the ground up. You’ll learn about the history of this unique and festive tradition, going beyond its reputation to get a deeper understanding of the REAL Mardi Gras. The whole family will love touring the space where our artisans create show-stopping floats for more than 40 parades each year.

This New Orleans tour is an experience you’ll want to document. There are so many photo opportunities in front of floats, with props, or wearing a traditional Mardi Gras costume, so don’t forget to bring your camera! And bring your appetite, too: every tour comes with a slice of King Cake (which is a real delicacy, as it’s hard to find out of season!).

GENERAL TOUR INFORMATION

  • 60 minute tours are offered 7 days a week.
  • The first tour begins at 9:30 a.m. and the last tour begins at 4:00 p.m.
  • Tours run every 30 minutes and last about an hour.
  • Each tour includes a display of Mardi Gras costumes, a video presentation, and a free slice of King Cake.
  • A free shuttle is provided with ticket purchase and provides pickups from 20 convenient downtown New Orleans locations.

(Information from MardiGrasWorld.com)

Mardi Gras Floats – Part 2

World Famous Float Builder

Kern Studios

Kern Studios

A FAMILY TRADITION

The rich history of Kern Studios dates back to Roy Kern, a local New Orleans artist who worked his way through the Great Depression by painting signs for barges and freighters in the Port of New Orleans.

THE EARLY DAYS

Roy’s son Blaine Kern was also an artist. To compensate for his mother’s medical bills, Blaine painted a mural in a hospital. The mural caught the eye of a surgeon who was the captain of the Mardi Gras Krewe of Alla. He invited Blaine and Roy to design and build the floats for his Krewe. In 1932, the first mule-drawn float was built on the back of a garbage wagon.

Kern Studios was officially founded in its current form in 1947. Blaine traveled throughout Europe to apprentice under the world’s leading float and costume makers. He brought home ideas from Italy, France, and Spain to develop the monumental scale and lavish ornamentation of today’s Mardi Gras parades. Blaine became the city’s leading parade designer and builder, working with legendary Krewes like Rex and Zulu. Today, Kern Studios builds parades every year for 18 different Krewes.

BEYOND MARDI GRAS

Kern Studios is now under the third generation of Kern leadership. Blaine’s son Barry Kern is the CEO and President of Kern Studios and Mardi Gras World. Barry has taken Kern Studios from a local Mardi Gras float building company to one of the world’s premier entertainment production and specialty fabrication companies. Kern Studios recently welcomed the fourth generation of leadership. Fitz Kern, Barry’s oldest son, has joined to oversee the company’s operations and strategic planning.

When Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans in 2005, Kern Studios and Mardi Gras World sustained severe wind damage but were spared from flooding. The warehouses and power generators turned into aid centers serving the Red Cross, Salvation Army, and the 82nd Airborne. The following spring, all Mardi Gras parades rolled as planned, just as New Orleans residents were returning home for the first time.

MARDI GRAS WORLD

After many requests for private tours of Kern Studios, the company decided to open a working studio to the public. Since 1984, Mardi Gras World has been one of the leading tourist attractions in New Orleans, drawing over 200,000 guests every year. Tours showcase every aspect of our process from prop designing and building, float painting, 3D scanning, robotic sculpting, and more. Visit the Mardi Gras World website to book a tour today.

(Information from kernstudios.com)


MARDI GRAS FLOATS – Part 1

Parades are a major part of celebrating Mardi Gras, and what’s a parade without some really great floats? Ever since krewes began parading through New Orleans over 100 years ago, parade floats have played a major role in Mardi Gras history.

Some floats are elaborate and beautiful, while others are funny and satirical. Many krewes have a theme to their parade each year, and so floats are created to reflect those themes. Thousands of dollars are poured into making these floats, and they’re not made overnight. Krewes work on these creations year-round, often at secret “dens” around the city. Krewes take their floats seriously.

Dozens of krewe members will ride on each float and there are anywhere from 15-40 full-size floats in any given parade, tossing beads and homemade “throws” to cheering crowds chanting “Throw Me Something, Mister”  (or “Miss” as the case may be)!

World Famous Float Builder

Kern Studios

Kern Studios, the world leader in float creation, has been a part of Mardi Gras history since 1932. Now the family-owned and operated business designs and builds floats for festivals and celebrations all over the world. See the magical creations by Kern Studios on display year around Mardi Gras World.

Kern Studios

More about Kern Studios in Part 2.

Happy Mardi Gras!

(Information from mardigrasneworleans.com)