Sadie Hawkins Day

Sadie Hawkins Day

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Sadie Hawkins Day originated from Al Capp’s comic strip, Li’l Abner, which ran from 1934 to 1977. In the comic strip, Sadie Hawkins was the homely looking daughter of Hekzebiah Hawkins, and at the age of 35 she had not yet married. In an effort to marry her off, Hekzebiah brought together all the unmarried men of the town of Dogpatch, and had them run out of town while being pursued by Sadie Hawkins. Whoever lost the foot race had to marry Sadie Hawkins, and this ended up being John Jonston. Hekzebiah named this Sadie Hawkins Day. The unmarried women of Dogpatch thought the day was a good idea, and Sadie Hawkins Day became a yearly event where unmarried women chased bachelors, who had to marry the women who caught them if they were dragged across the finish line before sundown. Sadie Hawkins Day first appeared in Li’l Abner on November 15, 1937. Because of a great demand from readers, Al Capp brought back Sadie Hawkins Day the following year, and continued to each year following. The day inspired real life Sadie Hawkins events, including Sadie Hawkins dances, where women ask men to dances. Lifemagazine reported in 1939 that 201 colleges held Sadie Hawkins Days. By 1952 Sadie Hawkins Day was celebrated at 40,000 different locations.

Sadie Hawkins Day is being observed today! It has been observed annually on November 13th since 1937.

Celebrate Sadie Hawkins Day by seeing if any Sadie Hawkins events are happening in your community. If you are a woman this is also a good day to ask out the guy you like!

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One visit to Goldwiser and you will make it your favorite place to buy and sell your precious metals!!!

(Information obtained from Checkiday.com)

 

VODKA

Vodka
Monopolowa Baczewski.JPG
Place of origin PolandRussia[1][2]
Main ingredients Alcoholwater
Vodka bottles on display

Large selection of vodkas and spirits at a store in Sanok, Poland

Vodka (Polishwódka [ˈvutka]Russianводка [ˈvotkə]) is a distilled beverage composed primarily of water and ethanol, but sometimes with traces of impurities and flavorings. Traditionally, vodka is made through the distillation of cereal grains or potatoes that have been fermented, though some modern brands, such as CirocCooranBong, and Bombora, use fruits or sugar.

Since the 1890s, the standard PolishRussianBelarusianCzechEstonianHungarianIcelandicLatvianLithuanianNorwegianSlovakSwedish and Ukrainian vodkas are 40% ABV or alcohol by volume (80 US proof), a percentage widely misattributed to Russian chemist Dmitri Mendeleev.[3][4] Meanwhile, the European Union has established a minimum of 37.5% ABV for any “European vodka” to be named as such.[5][6]Products sold as “vodka” in the United States must have a minimum alcohol content of 40%.[7] Even with these loose restrictions, most vodka sold contains 40% ABV.

Vodka is traditionally drunk “neat” (not mixed with water, ice, or other mixer), though it is often served freezer chilled in the vodka belt countries of Belarus, Estonia, Finland, Iceland, Lithuania, Latvia, Norway, Poland, Russia, Sweden and Ukraine. It is also used in cocktails and mixed drinks, such as the Vodka martiniCosmopolitanVodka TonicScrewdriverGreyhoundBlack or White RussianMoscow MuleBloody Mary and Bloody Caesar.

While most vodkas are unflavored, many flavored vodkas have been produced in traditional vodka-drinking areas, often as home-made recipes to improve vodka’s taste or for medicinal purposes. Flavorings include red pepper, ginger, fruit flavors, vanilla, chocolate (without sweetener), and cinnamon. In Russia, vodka flavored with honey and pepper, pertsovka in Russian, is also very popular. In Poland and Belarus, the leaves of the local bison grass are added to produce żubrówka (Polish) and zubrovka (Belarusian) vodka, with slightly sweet flavors and light amber colors. In Lithuania and Poland, a famous vodka containing honey is called krupnik.

This tradition of flavoring is also prevalent in the Nordic countries, where vodka seasoned with herbs, fruits and spices is the appropriate strong drink for several seasonal festivities. Sweden has forty-odd common varieties of herb-flavored vodka (kryddat brännvin). In Poland and Ukraine, a separate category (nalyvka in Ukraine and nalewka in Poland) is used for vodka-based spirits with fruit, root, flower, or herb extracts, which are often home-made or produced by small commercial distilleries. Their alcohol contents vary between 15 and 75%. In Estonia, vodkas are available with barberry, blackcurrant, cherry, green apple, lemon, vanilla and watermelon flavors.[41]

More recently, people have experimented with producing more unusual flavors of vodka, such as extremely hot chili flavored vodka[42] and even bacon vodka.[43] In most cases, vodka flavoring comes from a post-distillation infusion of flavors. Through the fermentation process, grain mash is transformed into a neutral alcohol beverage that is unflavored. The process of flavoring vodka so that it tastes like fruits, chocolate, and other foods occurs after fermentation and distillation. Various chemicals that reproduce the flavor profiles of foods are added into vodka to give it a specific taste.

1122 SPRING CYPRESS RD  SPRING TX 77373

Day of the Dead

The Day of the Dead (SpanishDía de Muertos) is a Mexican holiday celebrated throughout Mexico, in particular the Central and South regions, and by people of Mexican heritage elsewhere. The multi-day holiday focuses on gatherings of family and friends to pray for and remember friends and family members who have died, and help support their spiritual journey. In 2008, the tradition was inscribed in the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity by UNESCO.[1]

The holiday is sometimes called Día de los Muertos[2][3] in Anglophone countries, a back-translation of its original name, Día de Muertos. It is particularly celebrated in Mexico where the day is a public holiday. Prior to Spanish colonization in the 16th century, the celebration took place at the beginning of summer. Gradually, it was associated with October 31, November 1, and November 2 to coincide with the Western Christianity triduum of AllhallowtideAll Saints’ EveAll Saints’ Day, and All Souls’ Day.[4][5] Traditions connected with the holiday include building private altars called ofrendas, honoring the deceased using calaverasaztec marigolds, and the favorite foods and beverages of the departed, and visiting graves with these as gifts.[6] Visitors also leave possessions of the deceased at the graves.

Scholars trace the origins of the modern Mexican holiday to indigenous observances dating back hundreds of years and to an Aztec festivaldedicated to the goddess Mictecacihuatl. The holiday has spread throughout the world, being absorbed into other deep traditions in honor of the dead. It has become a national symbol and as such is taught (for educational purposes) in the nation’s schools. Many families celebrate a traditional “All Saints’ Day” associated with the Catholic Church.

Originally, the Day of the Dead as such was not celebrated in northern Mexico, where it was unknown until the 20th century because its indigenous people had different traditions. The people and the church rejected it as a day related to syncretizing pagan elements with Catholic Christianity. They held the traditional ‘All Saints’ Day‘ in the same way as other Christians in the world. There was limited Mesoamerican influence in this region, and relatively few indigenous inhabitants from the regions of Southern Mexico, where the holiday was celebrated. In the early 21st century in northern Mexico, Día de Muertos is observed because the Mexican government made it a national holiday based on educational policies from the 1960s; it has introduced this holiday as a unifying national tradition based on indigenous traditions.[7][8][9]

The Mexican Day of the Dead celebration is similar to other societies’ observances of a time to honor the dead. The Spanish tradition, for instance, includes festivals and parades, as well as gatherings of families at cemeteries to pray for their deceased loved ones at the end of the day.

People go to cemeteries to be with the souls of the departed and build private altars containing the favorite foods and beverages, as well as photos and memorabilia, of the departed. The intent is to encourage visits by the souls, so the souls will hear the prayers and the comments of the living directed to them. Celebrations can take a humorous tone, as celebrants remember funny events and anecdotes about the departed.[13]

Mexican cempasúchil(marigold) is the traditional flower used to honor the dead
Cempasúchil, alfeñiques and papel picado used to decorate an altar

Plans for the day are made throughout the year, including gathering the goods to be offered to the dead. During the three-day period families usually clean and decorate graves;[12] most visit the cemeteries where their loved ones are buried and decorate their graves with ofrendas (altars), which often include orange Mexican marigolds (Tagetes erecta) called cempasúchil (originally named cempoaxochitlNāhuatl for “twenty flowers”). In modern Mexico the marigold is sometimes called Flor de Muerto (Flower of Dead). These flowers are thought to attract souls of the dead to the offerings. It is also believed the bright petals with a strong scent can guide the souls from cemeteries to their family homes.[14]

Toys are brought for dead children (los angelitos, or “the little angels”), and bottles of tequilamezcal or pulque or jars of atole for adults. Families will also offer trinkets or the deceased’s favorite candies on the grave. Some families have ofrendas in homes, usually with foods such as candied pumpkin, pan de muerto (“bread of dead”), and sugar skulls; and beverages such as atole. The ofrendasare left out in the homes as a welcoming gesture for the deceased.[12] Some people believe the spirits of the dead eat the “spiritual essence” of the ofrendas food, so though the celebrators eat the food after the festivities, they believe it lacks nutritional value. Pillows and blankets are left out so the deceased can rest after their long journey. In some parts of Mexico, such as the towns of MixquicPátzcuaro and Janitzio, people spend all night beside the graves of their relatives. In many places, people have picnics at the grave site, as well.

Families tidying and decorating graves at a cemetery in Almoloya del Río in the State of Mexico, 1995

Some families build altars or small shrines in their homes;[12] these sometimes feature a Christian cross, statues or pictures of the Blessed Virgin Mary, pictures of deceased relatives and other people, scores of candles, and an ofrenda. Traditionally, families spend some time around the altar, praying and telling anecdotes about the deceased. In some locations, celebrants wear shells on their clothing, so when they dance, the noise will wake up the dead; some will also dress up as the deceased.

Public schools at all levels build altars with ofrendas, usually omitting the religious symbols. Government offices usually have at least a small altar, as this holiday is seen as important to the Mexican heritage.

Those with a distinctive talent for writing sometimes create short poems, called calaveras (skulls), mocking epitaphs of friends, describing interesting habits and attitudes or funny anecdotes. This custom originated in the 18th or 19th century after a newspaper published a poem narrating a dream of a cemetery in the future, “and all of us were dead”, proceeding to read the tombstones. Newspapers dedicate calaveras to public figures, with cartoons of skeletons in the style of the famous calaveras of José Guadalupe Posada, a Mexican illustrator. Theatrical presentations of Don Juan Tenorio by José Zorrilla (1817–1893) are also traditional on this day.

Modern representations of La Catrina

José Guadalupe Posada created a famous print of a figure he called La Calavera Catrina (“The Elegant Skull”) as a parody of a Mexican upper-class female. Posada’s striking image of a costumed female with a skeleton face has become associated with the Day of the Dead, and Catrina figures often are a prominent part of modern Day of the Dead observances.

A common symbol of the holiday is the skull (in Spanish calavera), which celebrants represent in masks, called calacas (colloquial term for skeleton), and foods such as sugar or chocolate skulls, which are inscribed with the name of the recipient on the forehead. Sugar skulls can be given as gifts to both the living and the dead. Other holiday foods include pan de muerto, a sweet egg bread made in various shapes from plain rounds to skulls and rabbits, often decorated with white frosting to look like twisted bones.

The traditions and activities that take place in celebration of the Day of the Dead are not universal, often varying from town to town. For example, in the town of Pátzcuaro on the Lago de Pátzcuaro in Michoacán, the tradition is very different if the deceased is a child rather than an adult. On November 1 of the year after a child’s death, the godparents set a table in the parents’ home with sweets, fruits, pan de muerto, a cross, a rosary (used to ask the Virgin Mary to pray for them) and candles. This is meant to celebrate the child’s life, in respect and appreciation for the parents. There is also dancing with colorful costumes, often with skull-shaped masks and devil masks in the plaza or garden of the town. At midnight on November 2, the people light candles and ride winged boats called mariposas (butterflies) to Janitzio, an island in the middle of the lake where there is a cemetery, to honor and celebrate the lives of the dead there.

In contrast, the town of Ocotepec, north of Cuernavaca in the State of Morelos, opens its doors to visitors in exchange for veladoras (small wax candles) to show respect for the recently deceased. In return the visitors receive tamales and atole. This is done only by the owners of the house where someone in the household has died in the previous year. Many people of the surrounding areas arrive early to eat for free and enjoy the elaborate altars set up to receive the visitors.

In some parts of the country (especially the cities, where in recent years other customs have been displaced) children in costumes roam the streets, knocking on people’s doors for a calaverita, a small gift of candies or money; they also ask passersby for it. This relatively recent custom is similar to that of Halloween’s trick-or-treating in the United States. Another peculiar tradition involving kids is La Danza de los Viejitos (the dance of the old men) when boy and young men dressed as granpas crouch and then jump in an energetic dance.[15]

Some people believe possessing Day of the Dead items can bring good luck. Many people get tattoos or have dolls of the dead to carry with them. They also clean their houses and prepare the favorite dishes of their deceased loved ones to place upon their altar or ofrenda.

 1122 SPRING CYPRESS RD  SPRING TX 77373

Best Cardio Exercises and Workouts

Cardio exercise is one of the most important things you can do for your body, whether you want to lose weightburn fat, or generally improve your health. You can use machines like a treadmill or an elliptical trainer, or you can create your own workout at home with a variety of cardio exercises like jogging in place, jumping jacks, or burpees. Anything that gets your heart rate into your target heart rate zone will work, but there are some workouts that give you a little more bang for your buck.

There’s no “right” cardio exercise, and the best choice for you is the one that is the most challenging, but that you can perform safely and enjoy. Exercises that intervals and circuits can help you get the most bang for your time spent.

The workouts below offer new and unique ways to get your heart rate up, burn more calories, and get in great shape.

40-20 HIIT Circuit Workout

HIIT Circuit Workout
 Long Jump. Ben Goldstein
  • Duration: 35 minutes
  • Fitness level: Intermediate/advanced
  • Equipment: A step or platform

Why It Works

This workout takes traditional interval training and turns up the heat by shortening the recovery intervals between exercises.

How It Works

  • Cumulative intensity: The cardio moves include a range of exercises from long jumps to burpees. Because the intensity is cumulative, you should feel breathless by the end of each circuit.
  • A very short recovery time: You do each high-intensity cardio exercise for 40 seconds, then rest just 20 seconds. When you do all four exercises, that comes out to four minutes of work. You can stick with that or repeat the circuit for a longer workout.
  • Activating your fat-burning hormones: Whenever you get into your anaerobic zone (it’s hard to speak in full sentences due to how taxed your breathing is) your body produces growth hormone and adrenaline. You burn more calories during the workout and you get a great afterburn.

With four total circuits, you’ll burn tons of calories. The variety of the workout and the exercises keeps things interesting.

Try it:  40-20 HIIT Circuit Workout

30-60-90 Mixed Interval Workout

  • Duration: 40 minutes
  • Fitness level: Intermediate/advanced
  • Equipment: Any cardio machine or activity

Why It Works

This workout includes high-impact, high-intensity exercises done in a format designed to get you out of your comfort zone, burn more calories, and increase your anaerobic threshold.

In this workout, you’ll be switching between intervals of 30, 60, and 90 seconds with equal resting periods. This means you’ll work at three different levels of intensity:

  1. Moderate intensity: A moderate intensity is around a level 6 on a perceived exertion scale from 1 to 10.
  2. High intensity: You can’t sustain this for long because you’re well out of your comfort zone, around a level 8 on the perceived exertion scale.
  3. Very high intensity: This is the shortest interval and the one that takes you to a level 8 or 9, which should be in your anaerobic zone.

By focusing on all levels of intensity, you’re training all of your body’s energy systems for a comprehensive, calorie-burning workout.

  • Duration: 30 minutes
  • Fitness level: Intermediate/advanced
  • Equipment: A treadmill, elliptical, or stationary bike
  • Why It Works

This series includes four different workouts that show you how to change the settings of some of the most common cardio machines in order to get you the most out of your workouts.

By changing your speed, resistance, and/or incline, you challenge your body and burn more calories.

How It Works

  • Workout 1: This treadmill workout has you increasing and decreasing your incline throughout the workout to help you burn more calories and stave off boredom.
  • Workout 2: This uses an elliptical trainer. You’ll gradually increase your resistance/incline for six-minute intervals, then drop down for two minutes, giving you a killer interval workout.
  • Workout 3: You’ll spend two minutes increasing resistance on a stationary bike, two minutes reducing resistance, and then one minute pedaling with high resistance to really get your heart rate up.
  • Workout 4: Skip the gym and get outdoors to do some walking, jogging, and sprinting to get your heart rate up.

Elliptical Interval WorkouT.

  • Duration: 40 minutes
  • Fitness level: Intermediate/advanced
  • Equipment: An elliptical machine

Why It Works

The elliptical can give you a great workout, but if you’re staying at the same level of resistance the entire time, you’re not doing your body any favors. The best way to get more out of your workouts is to change your settings throughout the workout to work harder and push your body out of its comfort zone.

How It Works

  • Varying levels of intensity: During this workout, you’ll increase and decrease your resistance levels, pushing you to work harder and then recover enough to get ready for the next push.
  • Varying intervals: Some intervals are one minute and some are two minutes.
  • Steady state intervals: To give you a break, there are steady state recovery intervals throughout the workout to help you catch your breath.

High Intensity Aerobic Intervals

  • Duration: 64 minutes
  • Fitness level: Intermediate/advanced
  • Equipment: Any cardio machine

Why It Works

High-intensity workouts are great, but you want to work at different levels of intensity throughout the week. This workout includes moderate-intensity intervals, but you’ll stay in your aerobic zone, meaning you won’t have to go breathless. This makes the workout longer and a little more comfortable than the other high-intensity workouts.

How It Works

  • Ten different intervals: Each interval is four minutes long.
  • Moderate intensity: For each four-minute interval, you’ll work just out of your comfort zone, around a level 6 on the perceived exertion scale. You should be working hard, but be able to sustain this level for the full four minutes.
  • Two-minute recovery: There are two-minute recovery intervals in between each work set. Take the speed, resistance, or incline down to a comfortable place so you can fully recover.

As you get tired, you may need to slow down or lower your incline or resistance to maintain the suggested levels of exertion. It’s normal for that to happen, so don’t feel like you have to stay at the same level for every interval.

Tabata Cardio Workout

  • Duration: 35 minutes
  • Fitness level: Advanced
  • Equipment: None

Why It Works

Tabata training is one of the best cardio workouts, taking you through very short, very intense intervals that only last 20 seconds. That doesn’t sound like much, but put together four exercises with only 10 seconds of rest in between and you’ll really feel this.

How It Works

  • Four Tabatas: There are four complete Tabata cycles, each with four different high-intensity, high-impact exercises.
  • Four minutes: You’ll do each exercise for 20 seconds, rest for 10, and then move on to the next one. After completing the four exercises, you’ll repeat them again for a total of four minutes.
  • Ten-second rests: Take full advantage of these, but realize you probably won’t be able to catch your breath in 10 seconds. That’s how you burn calories and build endurance.

Outdoor Circuit Workout

  • Duration: 30 minutes
  • Fitness level: Intermediate/advanced
  • Equipment: None

Why It Works

Outdoor workouts tend to revolve around a few basic activities—walking, running, and cycling. Those can all be effective calorie-burning exercises, but one way to ensure that is to try adding some intensity to your usual routine.

How It Works

Being outside challenges your body in a different way than machines do, so you’re already increasing your calorie burn. The following can add to that:

  • Steady-state cardio: You’ll walk or run for a period of time, keeping the intensity moderate and focusing on your aerobic zone.
  • Short bursts of speed or hills: Every so often, you’ll pick up the pace or head up a hill (if you’ve got one nearby) to push yourself out of the aerobic zone.
  • High-intensity exercises: Finally, you’ll stop during the workout for things like push-ups, long jumps, and other high-impact moves to take you even further out of your comfort zone.

Not only will you get a great workout, you’ll have some fun by trying something totally different.

Make Your Own Workout

  • Duration: Up to you
  • Fitness level: Beginner/intermediate/advanced
  • Equipment: None

Why It Works

Sometimes, the best workout is the one you make up on the fly. Just doing anything different for your body can help you make changes and see better results from your workout.

Ideas for Your Workout

  • Choose your exercises: Go through a list of cardio exercises and pick 10 moves to try.
  • Warm up: Make sure to start with a five-minute warm-up before going into the higher intensity exercises.
  • Start your timer: The easiest way to do this kind of workout is to do the moves for a set period of time, like 60 seconds.
  • Rests: Rest briefly between exercises and repeat all of them for a longer workout.

Feel free to mix and match your favorites for your own personalized workout. Try making a playlist of your favorite music to kick start your workout. 1122 SPRING CYPRESS RD  SPRING TX 77373

CONCHAS

Concha (plural conchas, meaning “shell” in Spanish) is a typical Mexican sweet bread (pan dulce). A concha consists of two parts, a sweet bread roll, and a crunchy topping (composed of sugar, butter and flour). [1]Conchas get their name from their round shape and the striped, broken “shell-like” appearance of their topping. Though the sweet roll is usually the same flavor, the top layer may have different flavors or colors (strawberry, coffee, chocolate, etc.). Conchas are popular in bakeries in Mexico and throughout the US. They are usually consumed with coffee at breakfast or as an afternoon snack at merienda1122 SPRING CYPRESS RD SPRING TX 77373

Stroke

Watch for these signs and symptoms if you think you or someone else may be having a stroke. Pay attention to when the signs and symptoms begin. The length of time they have been present can affect your treatment options:

  • Trouble with speaking and understanding. You may experience confusion. You may slur your words or have difficulty understanding speech.
  • Paralysis or numbness of the face, arm or leg. You may develop sudden numbness, weakness or paralysis in your face, arm or leg. This often happens just on one side of your body. Try to raise both your arms over your head at the same time. If one arm begins to fall, you may be having a stroke. Also, one side of your mouth may droop when you try to smile.
  • Trouble with seeing in one or both eyes. You may suddenly have blurred or blackened vision in one or both eyes, or you may see double.
  • Headache. A sudden, severe headache, which may be accompanied by vomiting, dizziness or altered consciousness, may indicate you’re having a stroke.
  • Trouble with walking. You may stumble or experience sudden dizziness, loss of balance or loss of coordination.

When to see a doctor

Seek immediate medical attention if you notice any signs or symptoms of a stroke, even if they seem to fluctuate or disappear. Think “FAST” and do the following:

  • Face. Ask the person to smile. Does one side of the face droop?
  • Arms. Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward? Or is one arm unable to rise up?
  • Speech. Ask the person to repeat a simple phrase. Is his or her speech slurred or strange?
  • Time. If you observe any of these signs, call 911 immediately.

Call 911 or your local emergency number right away. Don’t wait to see if symptoms stop. Every minute counts. The longer a stroke goes untreated, the greater the potential for brain damage and disability.

If you’re with someone you suspect is having a stroke, watch the person carefully while waiting for emergency assistance.

Causes

A stroke may be caused by a blocked artery (ischemic stroke) or the leaking or bursting of a blood vessel (hemorrhagic stroke). Some people may experience only a temporary disruption of blood flow to the brain (transient ischemic attack, or TIA) that doesn’t cause permanent damage.

Ischemic stroke

About 80 percent of strokes are ischemic strokes. Ischemic strokes occur when the arteries to your brain become narrowed or blocked, causing severely reduced blood flow (ischemia). The most common ischemic strokes include:

  • Thrombotic stroke. A thrombotic stroke occurs when a blood clot (thrombus) forms in one of the arteries that supply blood to your brain. A clot may be caused by fatty deposits (plaque) that build up in arteries and cause reduced blood flow (atherosclerosis) or other artery conditions.
  • Embolic stroke. An embolic stroke occurs when a blood clot or other debris forms away from your brain — commonly in your heart — and is swept through your bloodstream to lodge in narrower brain arteries. This type of blood clot is called an embolus.

Hemorrhagic stroke

Hemorrhagic stroke occurs when a blood vessel in your brain leaks or ruptures. Brain hemorrhages can result from many conditions that affect your blood vessels. These include:

  • Uncontrolled high blood pressure (hypertension)
  • Overtreatment with anticoagulants (blood thinners)
  • Weak spots in your blood vessel walls (aneurysms)

A less common cause of hemorrhage is the rupture of an abnormal tangle of thin-walled blood vessels (arteriovenous malformation). Types of hemorrhagic stroke include:

  • Intracerebral hemorrhage. In an intracerebral hemorrhage, a blood vessel in the brain bursts and spills into the surrounding brain tissue, damaging brain cells. Brain cells beyond the leak are deprived of blood and are also damaged.

    High blood pressure, trauma, vascular malformations, use of blood-thinning medications and other conditions may cause an intracerebral hemorrhage.

  • Subarachnoid hemorrhage. In a subarachnoid hemorrhage, an artery on or near the surface of your brain bursts and spills into the space between the surface of your brain and your skull. This bleeding is often signaled by a sudden, severe headache.

    A subarachnoid hemorrhage is commonly caused by the bursting of a small sack-shaped or berry-shaped aneurysm. After the hemorrhage, the blood vessels in your brain may widen and narrow erratically (vasospasm), causing brain cell damage by further limiting blood flow.

Transient ischemic attack (TIA)

A transient ischemic attack (TIA) — sometimes known as a ministroke — is a temporary period of symptoms similar to those you’d have in a stroke. A temporary decrease in blood supply to part of your brain causes TIAs, which may last as little as five minutes.

Like an ischemic stroke, a TIA occurs when a clot or debris blocks blood flow to part of your nervous system — but there is no permanent tissue damage and no lasting symptoms.

Seek emergency care even if your symptoms seem to clear up. Having a TIA puts you at greater risk of having a full-blown stroke, causing permanent damage later. If you’ve had a TIA, it means there’s likely a partially blocked or narrowed artery leading to your brain or a clot source in the heart.

It’s not possible to tell if you’re having a stroke or a TIA based only on your symptoms. Even when symptoms last for under an hour, there is still a risk of permanent tissue damage.

Risk factors

Many factors can increase your stroke risk. Some factors can also increase your chances of having a heart attack. Potentially treatable stroke risk factors include:

Lifestyle risk factors

  • Being overweight or obese
  • Physical inactivity
  • Heavy or binge drinking
  • Use of illicit drugs such as cocaine and methamphetamines

Medical risk factors

  • Blood pressure readings higher than 120/80 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg)
  • Cigarette smoking or exposure to secondhand smoke
  • High cholesterol
  • Diabetes
  • Obstructive sleep apnea
  • Cardiovascular disease, including heart failure, heart defects, heart infection or abnormal heart rhythm
  • Personal or family history of stroke, heart attack or transient ischemic attack.

Other factors associated with a higher risk of stroke include:

  • Age —People age 55 or older have a higher risk of stroke than do younger people.
  • Race — African-Americans have a higher risk of stroke than do people of other races.
  • Sex — Men have a higher risk of stroke than women. Women are usually older when they have strokes, and they’re more likely to die of strokes than are men.
  • Hormones — use of birth control pills or hormone therapies that include estrogen, as well as increased estrogen levels from pregnancy and childbirth.

Complications

A stroke can sometimes cause temporary or permanent disabilities, depending on how long the brain lacks blood flow and which part was affected. Complications may include:

  • Paralysis or loss of muscle movement. You may become paralyzed on one side of your body, or lose control of certain muscles, such as those on one side of your face or one arm. Physical therapy may help you return to activities affected by paralysis, such as walking, eating and dressing.
  • Difficulty talking or swallowing. A stroke might affect control of the muscles in your mouth and throat, making it difficult for you to talk clearly (dysarthria), swallow (dysphagia) or eat. You also may have difficulty with language (aphasia), including speaking or understanding speech, reading, or writing. Therapy with a speech-language pathologist might help.
  • Memory loss or thinking difficulties. Many people who have had strokes experience some memory loss. Others may have difficulty thinking, making judgments, reasoning and understanding concepts.
  • Emotional problems. People who have had strokes may have more difficulty controlling their emotions, or they may develop depression.
  • Pain. Pain, numbness or other strange sensations may occur in the parts of the body affected by stroke. For example, if a stroke causes you to lose feeling in your left arm, you may develop an uncomfortable tingling sensation in that arm.

    People also may be sensitive to temperature changes, especially extreme cold, after a stroke. This complication is known as central stroke pain or central pain syndrome. This condition generally develops several weeks after a stroke, and it may improve over time. But because the pain is caused by a problem in your brain, rather than a physical injury, there are few treatments.

  • Changes in behavior and self-care ability. People who have had strokes may become more withdrawn and less social or more impulsive. They may need help with grooming and daily chores.

As with any brain injury, the success of treating these complications varies from person to person.

Prevention

Knowing your stroke risk factors, following your doctor’s recommendations and adopting a healthy lifestyle are the best steps you can take to prevent a stroke. If you’ve had a stroke or a transient ischemic attack (TIA), these measures might help prevent another stroke. The follow-up care you receive in the hospital and afterward also may play a role as well.

Many stroke prevention strategies are the same as strategies to prevent heart disease. In general, healthy lifestyle recommendations include:

  • Controlling high blood pressure (hypertension). This is one of the most important things you can do to reduce your stroke risk. If you’ve had a stroke, lowering your blood pressure can help prevent a subsequent TIA or stroke.

    Exercising, managing stress, maintaining a healthy weight and limiting the amount of sodium and alcohol you eat and drink can all help to keep high blood pressure in check. In addition to recommending lifestyle changes, your doctor may prescribe medications to treat high blood pressure.

  • Lowering the amount of cholesterol and saturated fat in your diet. Eating less cholesterol and fat, especially saturated fat and trans fats, may reduce the plaque in your arteries. If you can’t control your cholesterol through dietary changes alone, your doctor may prescribe a cholesterol-lowering medication.
  • Quitting tobacco use. Smoking raises the risk of stroke for smokers and nonsmokers exposed to secondhand smoke. Quitting tobacco use reduces your risk of stroke.
  • Controlling diabetes. You can manage diabetes with diet, exercise, weight control and medication.
  • Maintaining a healthy weight. Being overweight contributes to other stroke risk factors, such as high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Losing as little as 10 pounds may lower your blood pressure and improve your cholesterol levels.
  • Eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables. A diet containing five or more daily servings of fruits or vegetables may reduce your risk of stroke. Following the Mediterranean diet, which emphasizes olive oil, fruit, nuts, vegetables and whole grains, may be helpful.
  • Exercising regularly. Aerobic or “cardio” exercise reduces your risk of stroke in many ways. Exercise can lower your blood pressure, increase your level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and improve the overall health of your blood vessels and heart. It also helps you lose weight, control diabetes and reduce stress. Gradually work up to 30 minutes of activity — such as walking, jogging, swimming or bicycling — on most, if not all, days of the week.
  • Drinking alcohol in moderation, if at all. Alcohol can be both a risk factor and a protective measure for stroke. Heavy alcohol consumption increases your risk of high blood pressure, ischemic strokes and hemorrhagic strokes. However, drinking small to moderate amounts of alcohol, such as one drink a day, may help prevent ischemic stroke and decrease your blood’s clotting tendency. Alcohol may also interact with other drugs you’re taking. Talk to your doctor about what’s appropriate for you.
  • Treating obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Your doctor may recommend an overnight oxygen assessment to screen for OSA — a sleep disorder in which the oxygen level intermittently drops during the night. Treatment for OSA includes oxygen at night or wearing a small device in your mouth to help you breathe.
  • Avoiding illegal drugs. Certain street drugs, such as cocaine and methamphetamines, are established risk factors for a TIA or a stroke. Cocaine reduces blood flow and can narrow the arteries.

Preventive medications

If you’ve had an ischemic stroke or TIA, your doctor may recommend medications to help reduce your risk of having another stroke. These include:

  • Anti-platelet drugs. Platelets are cells in your blood that form clots. Anti-platelet drugs make these cells less sticky and less likely to clot. The most commonly used anti-platelet medication is aspirin. Your doctor can help you determine the right dose of aspirin for you.

    Your doctor might also consider prescribing Aggrenox, a combination of low-dose aspirin and the anti-platelet drug dipyridamole to reduce the risk of blood clotting. If aspirin doesn’t prevent your TIA or stroke, or if you can’t take aspirin, your doctor may instead prescribe an anti-platelet drug such as clopidogrel (Plavix).

  • Anticoagulants. These drugs, which include heparin and warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven), reduce blood clotting. Heparin is fast acting and may be used over a short period of time in the hospital. Slower acting warfarin may be used over a longer term.

    Warfarin is a powerful blood-thinning drug, so you’ll need to take it exactly as directed and watch for side effects. Your doctor may prescribe these drugs if you have certain blood-clotting disorders, certain arterial abnormalities, an abnormal heart rhythm or other heart problems. Other newer blood thinners may be used if your TIA or stroke was caused by an abnormal heart rhythm.

THANKS TO

Steak

A beef steak dinner, served with roasted eggplantzucchini and garlic

A steak topped with sautéed mushrooms

steak (/ˈstk/) is a meat generally sliced across the muscle fibers, potentially including a bone. Exceptions, in which the meat is sliced parallel to the fibers, include the skirt steak cut from the plate, the flank steak cut from the abdominal muscles, and the Silverfinger steak cut from the loin and includes three rib bones. In a larger sense, there are also fish steaks, ground meat steaks, pork steak and many more varieties of steak.

Steak is usually grilled,[1] but can be pan-fried. It is often grilled in an attempt to replicate the flavor of steak cooked over the glowing coals of an open fire.[1] Steak can also be cooked in sauce, such as in steak and kidney pie, or minced and formed into patties, such as hamburgers.

Steaks are also cut from grazing animals, usually farmed, other than cattle, including bisoncamelgoathorsekangaroo,[2][3] sheepostrichpigsreindeerturkeydeer and zebu as well as various types of fish, especially salmon and large pelagic fish such as swordfishshark and marlin. For some meats, such as porklamb and muttonchevon and veal, these cuts are often referred to as chops. Some cured meat, such as gammon, is commonly served as steak.

Grilled Portobello mushroom may be called mushroom steak, and similarly for other vegetarian dishes.[4] Imitation steak is a food product that is formed into a steak shape from various pieces of meat. Grilled fruits such as watermelon have been used as vegetarian steak alternatives. Thanks to Wikipedia.

1122 Spring Cypress Spring TX  77373.

APPLE CIDER VINEGAR

Apple cider vinegar, a vinegar made from apples, sugar and yeast,[1] is used in salad dressings, marinadesvinaigrettesfood preservatives, and chutneys. It is made by crushing apples and squeezing out the liquid. Bacteria and yeast are added to the liquid to start the alcoholic fermentationprocess, and the sugars are turned into alcohol. In a second fermentation process, the alcohol is converted into vinegar by acetic acid-forming bacteria (acetobacter). Acetic acid and malic acid give vinegar its sour taste.[1] Apple cider vinegar has no nutritional value, aside from some calories, with all nutrients at negligible levels.

1. High in Acetic Acid, With Potent Biological Effects
Unfiltered Apple Cider Vinegar

Apple cider vinegar is made in a two-step process, related to how alcohol is made (1).

The first step exposes crushed apples (or apple cider) to yeast, which ferment the sugars and turn them into alcohol.

In the second step, bacteria are added to the alcohol solution, which further ferment the alcohol and turn it into acetic acid — the main active compound in vinegar.

In French, the word “vinegar” actually means “sour wine.”

Organic, unfiltered apple cider vinegar (like Bragg’s) also contains “mother,” strands of proteins, enzymes and friendly bacteria that give the product a murky appearance.

Some people believe that the “mother” is responsible for most of the health benefits, although there are currently no studies to support this.

Apple cider vinegar only contains about three calories per tablespoon, which is very low.

There are not many vitamins or minerals in it, but it does contain a small amount of potassium. Quality apple cider vinegar also contains some amino acids and antioxidants.

2. Can Kill Many Types of Harmful Bacteria

Vinegar can help kill pathogens, including bacteria (2).

It has traditionally been used for cleaning and disinfecting, treating nail fungus, lice, warts and ear infections.

Hippocrates, the father of modern medicine, used vinegar for wound cleaning over two thousand years ago.

Vinegar has also been used as a food preservative, and studies show that it inhibits bacteria (like E. coli) from growing in food and spoiling it (234).

If you’re looking for a natural way to preserve your food, then apple cider vinegar could be highly useful.

There have also been anecdotal reports of diluted apple cider vinegar helping with acne when applied to the skin, but I didn’t find any strong research to confirm this.

SUMMARYThe main substance in vinegar, acetic acid, can kill harmful bacteria or prevent them from multiplying. It has a history of use as a disinfectant and natural preservative.

3. Lowers Blood Sugar Levels and Fights Diabetes

By far, the most successful application of vinegar to date is in patients with type 2 diabetes.

Type 2 diabetes is characterized by high blood sugar levels, either because of insulin resistance or an inability to produce insulin (5).

However, high blood sugar can also be a problem in people who don’t have diabetes. It is believed to be a major cause of aging and various chronic diseases.

Pretty much everyone should benefit from keeping their blood sugar levels in the normal range. The most effective (and healthiest) way to do that is to avoid refined carbs and sugar, but apple cider vinegar can also have a powerful effect.

Vinegar has been shown to have numerous benefits for blood sugar and insulin levels:

  • Improves insulin sensitivity during a high-carb meal by 19–34% and significantly lowers blood sugar and insulin responses (6).
  • Reduces blood sugar by 34% after eating 50 grams of white bread (7).
  • 2 tablespoons of apple cider vinegar before bedtime can reduce fasting blood sugar in the morning by 4% (8).
  • Numerous other studies in humans show that vinegar can improve insulin function and lower blood sugar levels after meals (910).

For these reasons, vinegar can be useful for people with diabetes, pre-diabetes, or those who want to keep their blood sugar levels low for other reasons.

If you’re currently taking blood-sugar-lowering medications, check with your doctor before increasing your intake of any type of vinegar.

SUMMARYApple cider vinegar has shown great promise in improving insulin sensitivity and helping lower blood sugar responses after meals.

4. Helps You Lose Weight and Reduces Belly Fat

Surprisingly, studies also show that vinegar can help you lose weight.

Several human studies show that vinegar can increase satiety, help you eat fewer calories and lead to actual pounds lost on the scale.

For example, if people take vinegar along with a high-carb meal, they get increased feelings of fullness and end up eating 200–275 fewer calories for the rest of the day (1112).

A study in 175 people with obesity showed that daily apple cider vinegar consumption led to reduced belly fat and weight loss (13):

  • 15 mL (1 tablespoon): Lost 2.6 pounds, or 1.2 kilograms.
  • 30 mL (2 tablespoons): Lost 3.7 pounds, or 1.7 kilograms.

However, keep in mind that this study went on for 3 months, so the true effects on body weight seem to be rather modest.

That said, just adding or subtracting single foods or ingredients rarely has a noticeable effect on weight.

It’s the entire diet/lifestyle that counts and you need to combine several effective methods to see results.

Overall, it seems like apple cider vinegar is useful as a weight loss aid, mainly by promoting satiety and lowering blood sugar and insulin levels.

But it won’t work any miracles on its own.

SUMMARYStudies suggest that vinegar can increase feelings of fullness and help people eat fewer calories, which leads to weight loss.

5. Lowers Cholesterol and Improves Heart Health

Heart disease is currently the world’s most common cause of premature death (14).

It is known that several biological factors are linked to either a decreased or increased risk of heart disease.

Several of these “risk factors” can be improved by vinegar consumption, but many of the studies were done in animals.

These animal studies suggest that apple cider vinegar can lower cholesterol and triglyceride levels, along with several other heart disease risk factors (151617).

There are also some studies showing that vinegar reduces blood pressure in rats, which is a major risk factor for heart disease and kidney problems (1819).

The only human evidence so far is an observational study from Harvard showing that women who ate salad dressings with vinegar had a reduced risk of heart disease (20).

But this type of study can only show an association, it cannot prove that the vinegar caused anything.

As mentioned above, human studies also show that apple cider vinegar can lower blood sugar levels, improve insulin sensitivity and help fight diabetes. These factors should also lead to reduced risk of heart disease.

SUMMARYSeveral animal studies have shown that vinegar can reduce blood triglycerides, cholesterol and blood pressure. This could lead to a reduced risk of developing heart disease.

6. May Have Protective Effects Against Cancer

Cancer is a terrible disease characterized by the uncontrolled growth of cells.

There is a lot of hype online about the anti-cancer effects of apple cider vinegar.

In fact, numerous studies have shown that various types of vinegar can kill cancer cells and shrink tumors (212223).

However, all of the studies on this were done in isolated cells in test tubes, or rats, which proves nothing about what happens in a living, breathing human.

That said, some observational studies in humans have shown that vinegar consumption is linked to decreased esophageal cancer in China, but increased bladder cancer in Serbia (2425).

It is possible that consuming apple cider vinegar may help prevent cancer, but this needs to be researched more before any recommendations can be made.

SUMMARYSome studies in test tubes and rats have shown that vinegar can slow the growth of cancer cells and shrink tumors.

Dosage and How to Use

The best way to incorporate apple cider vinegar into your diet is to use it in your cooking — for salad dressings, homemade mayonnaise and that sort of thing.

Some people also like to dilute it in water and drink it as a beverage. Common dosages range from 1–2 teaspoons (5–10 ml) to 1–2 tablespoons (15–30 ml) per day, mixed in a large glass of water.

It’s best to start with small doses and avoid taking large amounts, because too much vinegar can cause harmful side effects.

It is recommended to use organic, unfiltered apple cider vinegar with the “mother.”

Bragg’s seems to be the most popular option, which is available on Amazon along with tons of interesting testimonials and reviews that are fun to browse through.

SUMMARYA common dosage for apple cider vinegar ranges from 1 teaspoon to 2 tablespoons per day, either used in cooking or mixed in a glass of water.

The Bottom Line

There are a lot of wild claims about apple cider vinegar on the internet.

Some say that it can increase energy levels and have all sorts of beneficial effects on health.

Unfortunately, many of these claims are not supported by science.

Of course, absence of proof isn’t proof that something isn’t happening and anecdotes often end up becoming supported by science down the line.

However, I wouldn’t hold my breath waiting for more studies, since research on natural health products like these are both few and far between.

From the little evidence available, I think that apple cider vinegar may be useful and is definitely a good candidate for some experimentation if you’re interested in it.

At the very least, apple cider vinegar seems to be safe as long as you don’t go overboard and take excessive amounts.

Apple cider vinegar also has various other non-health related uses like hair conditioning, skin care, dental care, pet use and as a cleaning agent (to name a few).

These can be highly useful for people who like to keep things as natural and chemical-free as possible.

At the end of the day, apple cider vinegar appears to be very healthy.

It’s not a “miracle” or a “cure-all” like some people seem to believe, but it does clearly have some important health benefits, especially for blood sugar and weight control.

Healthline may receive a portion of the revenues if you make a purchase using one of the links above.

Written by Kris Gunnars, BS  and  WIKIPEDIA  1122 SPRING CYPRESS RD SPRING TX 77373

HONDURAS Independence day

Honduras  officially the Republic of Honduras (SpanishRepública de Honduras), is a republic in Central America. It has at times been referred to as Spanish Honduras to differentiate it from British Honduras, which became modern-day Belize.Honduras is bordered to the west by Guatemala, to the southwest by El Salvador, to the southeast by Nicaragua, to the south by the Pacific Ocean at the Gulf of Fonseca, and to the north by the Gulf of Honduras, a large inlet of the Caribbean Sea.

Honduras was home to several important Mesoamerican cultures, most notably the Maya, before the Spanish invaded in the sixteenth century. The Spanish introduced Roman Catholicism and the now predominant Spanish language, along with numerous customs that have blended with the indigenous culture. Honduras became independent in 1821 and has since been a republic, although it has consistently endured much social strife and political instability, and remains one of the poorest countries in the western hemisphere. In 1960, the northern part of what was the Mosquito Coast was transferred from Nicaragua to Honduras by the International Court of Justice.

The nation’s economy is primarily agricultural, making it especially vulnerable to natural disasters such as Hurricane Mitch in 1998. The lower class is primarily agriculturally based while wealth is concentrated in the country’s urban centers.Honduras has a Human Development Index of .625, classifying it as a nation with medium development.When the Index is adjusted for income inequality, its Inequality-adjusted Human Development Index is .443.

Honduran society is predominately Mestizo; however, American Indian, Black and White individuals also live in Honduras (2017).The nation had a relatively high political stability until its 2009 coup and again with the 2017 presidential election.Honduras has the world’s highest murder rateand high levels of sexual violence.

Honduras spans about 112,492 km2 and has a population exceeding 9 million. Its northern portions are part of the Western Caribbean Zone, as reflected in the area’s demographics and culture. Honduras is known for its rich natural resources, including mineralscoffeetropical fruit, and sugar cane, as well as for its growing textiles industry, which serves the international market.

Independence (1821)

Honduras gained independence from Spain in 1821 and was a part of the First Mexican Empire until 1823, when it became part of the United Provinces of Central America. It has been an independent republic and has held regular elections since 1838. In the 1840s and 1850s Honduras participated in several failed attempts at Central American unity, such as the Confederation of Central America (1842–1845), the covenant of Guatemala (1842), the Diet of Sonsonate (1846), the Diet of Nacaome (1847) and National Representation in Central America (1849–1852). Although Honduras eventually adopted the name Republic of Honduras, the unionist ideal never waned, and Honduras was one of the Central American countries that pushed the hardest for a policy of regional unity.

Neoliberal policies favoring international trade and investment began in the 1870s, and soon foreign interests became involved, first in shipping from the north coast, especially tropical fruit and most notably bananas, and then in building railroads. In 1888, a projected railroad line from the Caribbean coast to the capital, Tegucigalpa, ran out of money when it reached San Pedro Sula. As a result, San Pedro grew into the nation’s primary industrial center and second-largest city. Comayagua was the capital of Honduras until 1880, when the capital moved to Tegucigalpa.

Since independence, nearly 300 small internal rebellions and civil wars have occurred in the country, including some changes of régime.

 1122 SPRING CYPRESS

SPRING TX 77373