blackberry

The blackberry is an edible fruit produced by many species in the genus Rubus in the family Rosaceae, hybrids among these species within the subgenus Rubus, and hybrids between the subgenera Rubus and Idaeobatus. The taxonomy of the blackberries has historically been confused because of hybridization and apomixis, so that species have often been grouped together and called species aggregates. For example, the entire subgenus Rubus has been called the Rubus fruticosus aggregate, although the species R. fruticosus is considered a synonym of R. plicatus.[1]

Cultivated blackberries are notable for their significant contents of dietary fibervitamin C, and vitamin K (table).[10] A 100 gram serving of raw blackberries supplies 43 calories and 5 grams of dietary fiber or 25% of the recommended Daily Value (DV) (table).[10] In 100 grams, vitamin C and vitamin K contents are 25% and 19% DV, respectively, while other essential nutrients are low in content (table).

Blackberries contain both soluble and insoluble fiber components.

A bee, Bombus hypnorum, pollinating blackberries

Blackberry leaves are food for certain caterpillars; some grazing mammals, especially deer, are also very fond of the leaves. Caterpillars of the concealer moth Alabonia geoffrella have been found feeding inside dead blackberry shoots. When mature, the berries are eaten and their seeds dispersed by several mammals, such as the red fox and the Eurasian badger, as well as by small birds.[8]

A basket of wild blackberries

Blackberries grow wild throughout most of Europe. They are an important element in the ecology of many countries, and harvesting the berries is a popular pastime. However, the plants are also considered a weed, sending down roots from branches that touch the ground, and sending up suckersfrom the roots. In some parts of the world without native blackberries, such as in AustraliaChileNew Zealand, and the Pacific Northwest of North America, some blackberry species, particularly Rubus armeniacus (Himalayan blackberry) and Rubus laciniatus (evergreen blackberry), are naturalisedand considered an invasive species and a serious weed.[4]

Blackberry fruits are red before they are ripe, leading to an old expression that “blackberries are red when they’re green”.[9]

In various parts of the United States, wild blackberries are sometimes called “black-caps”, a term more commonly used for black raspberries, Rubus occidentalis.

As there is evidence from the Iron Age Haraldskær Woman that she consumed blackberries some 2,500 years ago, it is reasonable to conclude that blackberries have been eaten by humans over thousands of years.

1122 Spring Cypress rd  Spring TX 77373

Mole

Mole (/ˈml//ˈmli/ Spanish pronunciation: [ˈmole]; from Nahuatl mōlli, “sauce”) is a traditional sauce originally used in Mexican cuisine, as well as for dishes based on these sauces. Outside Mexico, it often refers specifically to mole poblano. In contemporary Mexico, the term is used for a number of sauces, some quite dissimilar, including black, red/colorado, yellow, green, almendrado, de olla, huaxmole, guacamole and pipián. Generally, a mole sauce contains a fruit, chili pepper, nut and such spices as black peppercinnamoncumin, and chocolate.

History[edit]

Woman cooking mole at a small restaurant in San Pedro Atocpan

Two states in Mexico claim to be the origin of mole: Puebla and Oaxaca[1] The best-known moles are native to these two states, but other regions in Mexico also make various types of mole sauces.[2]

Moles come in various flavors and ingredients, with chili peppers as the common factor. However, the classic mole version is the variety called mole poblano, which is a dark red or brown sauce served over meat. The dish has become a culinary symbol of Mexico’s mestizaje, or mixed indigenous and European heritage, both for the types of ingredients it contains and because of the legends surrounding its origin.[2]

A common legend of its creation takes place at the Convent of Santa Clara in Puebla early in the colonial period. Upon hearing that the archbishop was going to visit, the convent nuns panicked because they were poor and had almost nothing to prepare. The nuns prayed and brought together the little bits of what they did have, including chili peppers, spices, day-old bread, nuts, and a little chocolate. They killed an old turkey, cooked it and put the sauce on top; the archbishop loved it. When one of the nuns was asked the name of the dish, she replied, “I made a mole.” Mole was the ancient word for mix; now this word mostly refers to the dish, and is rarely used to signify other kinds of mixes in Spanish.[2][3]

A similar version of the story says that monk Fray Pascual invented the dish, again to serve the archbishop of Puebla. In this version, spices were knocked over or blown over into pots in which chicken were cooking.[2][4] Other versions of the story substitute the viceroy of New Spain, such as Juan de Palafox y Mendoza in place of the archbishop.[5]

Selling mole mixes at the Feria Nacional del Mole in San Pedro Atocpan

Modern mole is a mixture of ingredients from North America, Europe and Africa, making it one of the first intercontinental dishes created in the Americas.[6] Its base, however, is indigenous. Nahuatl speakers had a preparation they called mōlli ([ˈmoːlːi]), meaning “sauce”, or chīlmōlli ([t͡ʃiːlˈmoːlːi]) for chili sauce.[7][8][9] In the book General History of the Things of New SpainBernardino de Sahagún says that mollis were used in a number of dishes, including those for fish, game and vegetables.[10] Theories about the origins of mole have supposed that it was something imposed upon the natives or that it was the product of the baroque artistry of Puebla, but there is not enough evidence for definitive answers.[11] Coincidence or not, the word “mōlli” seems to resemble the Portuguese word molho, which means “sauce”.

While chili pepper sauces existed in pre-Hispanic Mexico, the complicated moles of today did not. They did not contain chocolate, which was used as a beverage, and in all of the writings of Sahagún, there is no mention at all of it being used to flavor food.[12] Most likely what occurred was a gradual modification of the original molli sauce, adding more and different ingredients depending on the location. This diversified the resulting sauces into various types.[8][9] Ingredients that have been added into moles include nuts (such as almondspeanuts, or pine nuts), seeds (such as sesame seeds, pumpkin seeds, or squash seeds), cilantro, seedless grapes, plantains, garlic, onions, cinnamon, and chocolate. However, most versions do not contain cinnamon or chocolate. What remained the same was the use of chili peppers, especially anchopasillamulato and chipotle, and the consistency of the sauce.[8] The true story of how mole developed may never be truly known, as the first recipes did not appear until after the Mexican War of Independence in 1810. The Nahuatl etymology of the name probably indicates a Mesoamerican origin.[2]

 1122 SPRING CYPRESS RD SPRING TX 77373

Steak

A beef steak dinner, served with roasted eggplantzucchini and garlic

A steak topped with sautéed mushrooms

steak (/ˈstk/) is a meat generally sliced across the muscle fibers, potentially including a bone. Exceptions, in which the meat is sliced parallel to the fibers, include the skirt steak cut from the plate, the flank steak cut from the abdominal muscles, and the Silverfinger steak cut from the loin and includes three rib bones. In a larger sense, there are also fish steaks, ground meat steaks, pork steak and many more varieties of steak.

Steak is usually grilled,[1] but can be pan-fried. It is often grilled in an attempt to replicate the flavor of steak cooked over the glowing coals of an open fire.[1] Steak can also be cooked in sauce, such as in steak and kidney pie, or minced and formed into patties, such as hamburgers.

Steaks are also cut from grazing animals, usually farmed, other than cattle, including bisoncamelgoathorsekangaroo,[2][3] sheepostrichpigsreindeerturkeydeer and zebu as well as various types of fish, especially salmon and large pelagic fish such as swordfishshark and marlin. For some meats, such as porklamb and muttonchevon and veal, these cuts are often referred to as chops. Some cured meat, such as gammon, is commonly served as steak.

Grilled Portobello mushroom may be called mushroom steak, and similarly for other vegetarian dishes.[4] Imitation steak is a food product that is formed into a steak shape from various pieces of meat. Grilled fruits such as watermelon have been used as vegetarian steak alternatives. Thanks to Wikipedia.

1122 Spring Cypress Spring TX  77373.

APPLE CIDER VINEGAR

Apple cider vinegar, a vinegar made from apples, sugar and yeast,[1] is used in salad dressings, marinadesvinaigrettesfood preservatives, and chutneys. It is made by crushing apples and squeezing out the liquid. Bacteria and yeast are added to the liquid to start the alcoholic fermentationprocess, and the sugars are turned into alcohol. In a second fermentation process, the alcohol is converted into vinegar by acetic acid-forming bacteria (acetobacter). Acetic acid and malic acid give vinegar its sour taste.[1] Apple cider vinegar has no nutritional value, aside from some calories, with all nutrients at negligible levels.

1. High in Acetic Acid, With Potent Biological Effects
Unfiltered Apple Cider Vinegar

Apple cider vinegar is made in a two-step process, related to how alcohol is made (1).

The first step exposes crushed apples (or apple cider) to yeast, which ferment the sugars and turn them into alcohol.

In the second step, bacteria are added to the alcohol solution, which further ferment the alcohol and turn it into acetic acid — the main active compound in vinegar.

In French, the word “vinegar” actually means “sour wine.”

Organic, unfiltered apple cider vinegar (like Bragg’s) also contains “mother,” strands of proteins, enzymes and friendly bacteria that give the product a murky appearance.

Some people believe that the “mother” is responsible for most of the health benefits, although there are currently no studies to support this.

Apple cider vinegar only contains about three calories per tablespoon, which is very low.

There are not many vitamins or minerals in it, but it does contain a small amount of potassium. Quality apple cider vinegar also contains some amino acids and antioxidants.

2. Can Kill Many Types of Harmful Bacteria

Vinegar can help kill pathogens, including bacteria (2).

It has traditionally been used for cleaning and disinfecting, treating nail fungus, lice, warts and ear infections.

Hippocrates, the father of modern medicine, used vinegar for wound cleaning over two thousand years ago.

Vinegar has also been used as a food preservative, and studies show that it inhibits bacteria (like E. coli) from growing in food and spoiling it (234).

If you’re looking for a natural way to preserve your food, then apple cider vinegar could be highly useful.

There have also been anecdotal reports of diluted apple cider vinegar helping with acne when applied to the skin, but I didn’t find any strong research to confirm this.

SUMMARYThe main substance in vinegar, acetic acid, can kill harmful bacteria or prevent them from multiplying. It has a history of use as a disinfectant and natural preservative.

3. Lowers Blood Sugar Levels and Fights Diabetes

By far, the most successful application of vinegar to date is in patients with type 2 diabetes.

Type 2 diabetes is characterized by high blood sugar levels, either because of insulin resistance or an inability to produce insulin (5).

However, high blood sugar can also be a problem in people who don’t have diabetes. It is believed to be a major cause of aging and various chronic diseases.

Pretty much everyone should benefit from keeping their blood sugar levels in the normal range. The most effective (and healthiest) way to do that is to avoid refined carbs and sugar, but apple cider vinegar can also have a powerful effect.

Vinegar has been shown to have numerous benefits for blood sugar and insulin levels:

  • Improves insulin sensitivity during a high-carb meal by 19–34% and significantly lowers blood sugar and insulin responses (6).
  • Reduces blood sugar by 34% after eating 50 grams of white bread (7).
  • 2 tablespoons of apple cider vinegar before bedtime can reduce fasting blood sugar in the morning by 4% (8).
  • Numerous other studies in humans show that vinegar can improve insulin function and lower blood sugar levels after meals (910).

For these reasons, vinegar can be useful for people with diabetes, pre-diabetes, or those who want to keep their blood sugar levels low for other reasons.

If you’re currently taking blood-sugar-lowering medications, check with your doctor before increasing your intake of any type of vinegar.

SUMMARYApple cider vinegar has shown great promise in improving insulin sensitivity and helping lower blood sugar responses after meals.

4. Helps You Lose Weight and Reduces Belly Fat

Surprisingly, studies also show that vinegar can help you lose weight.

Several human studies show that vinegar can increase satiety, help you eat fewer calories and lead to actual pounds lost on the scale.

For example, if people take vinegar along with a high-carb meal, they get increased feelings of fullness and end up eating 200–275 fewer calories for the rest of the day (1112).

A study in 175 people with obesity showed that daily apple cider vinegar consumption led to reduced belly fat and weight loss (13):

  • 15 mL (1 tablespoon): Lost 2.6 pounds, or 1.2 kilograms.
  • 30 mL (2 tablespoons): Lost 3.7 pounds, or 1.7 kilograms.

However, keep in mind that this study went on for 3 months, so the true effects on body weight seem to be rather modest.

That said, just adding or subtracting single foods or ingredients rarely has a noticeable effect on weight.

It’s the entire diet/lifestyle that counts and you need to combine several effective methods to see results.

Overall, it seems like apple cider vinegar is useful as a weight loss aid, mainly by promoting satiety and lowering blood sugar and insulin levels.

But it won’t work any miracles on its own.

SUMMARYStudies suggest that vinegar can increase feelings of fullness and help people eat fewer calories, which leads to weight loss.

5. Lowers Cholesterol and Improves Heart Health

Heart disease is currently the world’s most common cause of premature death (14).

It is known that several biological factors are linked to either a decreased or increased risk of heart disease.

Several of these “risk factors” can be improved by vinegar consumption, but many of the studies were done in animals.

These animal studies suggest that apple cider vinegar can lower cholesterol and triglyceride levels, along with several other heart disease risk factors (151617).

There are also some studies showing that vinegar reduces blood pressure in rats, which is a major risk factor for heart disease and kidney problems (1819).

The only human evidence so far is an observational study from Harvard showing that women who ate salad dressings with vinegar had a reduced risk of heart disease (20).

But this type of study can only show an association, it cannot prove that the vinegar caused anything.

As mentioned above, human studies also show that apple cider vinegar can lower blood sugar levels, improve insulin sensitivity and help fight diabetes. These factors should also lead to reduced risk of heart disease.

SUMMARYSeveral animal studies have shown that vinegar can reduce blood triglycerides, cholesterol and blood pressure. This could lead to a reduced risk of developing heart disease.

6. May Have Protective Effects Against Cancer

Cancer is a terrible disease characterized by the uncontrolled growth of cells.

There is a lot of hype online about the anti-cancer effects of apple cider vinegar.

In fact, numerous studies have shown that various types of vinegar can kill cancer cells and shrink tumors (212223).

However, all of the studies on this were done in isolated cells in test tubes, or rats, which proves nothing about what happens in a living, breathing human.

That said, some observational studies in humans have shown that vinegar consumption is linked to decreased esophageal cancer in China, but increased bladder cancer in Serbia (2425).

It is possible that consuming apple cider vinegar may help prevent cancer, but this needs to be researched more before any recommendations can be made.

SUMMARYSome studies in test tubes and rats have shown that vinegar can slow the growth of cancer cells and shrink tumors.

Dosage and How to Use

The best way to incorporate apple cider vinegar into your diet is to use it in your cooking — for salad dressings, homemade mayonnaise and that sort of thing.

Some people also like to dilute it in water and drink it as a beverage. Common dosages range from 1–2 teaspoons (5–10 ml) to 1–2 tablespoons (15–30 ml) per day, mixed in a large glass of water.

It’s best to start with small doses and avoid taking large amounts, because too much vinegar can cause harmful side effects.

It is recommended to use organic, unfiltered apple cider vinegar with the “mother.”

Bragg’s seems to be the most popular option, which is available on Amazon along with tons of interesting testimonials and reviews that are fun to browse through.

SUMMARYA common dosage for apple cider vinegar ranges from 1 teaspoon to 2 tablespoons per day, either used in cooking or mixed in a glass of water.

The Bottom Line

There are a lot of wild claims about apple cider vinegar on the internet.

Some say that it can increase energy levels and have all sorts of beneficial effects on health.

Unfortunately, many of these claims are not supported by science.

Of course, absence of proof isn’t proof that something isn’t happening and anecdotes often end up becoming supported by science down the line.

However, I wouldn’t hold my breath waiting for more studies, since research on natural health products like these are both few and far between.

From the little evidence available, I think that apple cider vinegar may be useful and is definitely a good candidate for some experimentation if you’re interested in it.

At the very least, apple cider vinegar seems to be safe as long as you don’t go overboard and take excessive amounts.

Apple cider vinegar also has various other non-health related uses like hair conditioning, skin care, dental care, pet use and as a cleaning agent (to name a few).

These can be highly useful for people who like to keep things as natural and chemical-free as possible.

At the end of the day, apple cider vinegar appears to be very healthy.

It’s not a “miracle” or a “cure-all” like some people seem to believe, but it does clearly have some important health benefits, especially for blood sugar and weight control.

Healthline may receive a portion of the revenues if you make a purchase using one of the links above.

Written by Kris Gunnars, BS  and  WIKIPEDIA  1122 SPRING CYPRESS RD SPRING TX 77373

Broccoli

When it comes to great-tasting nutrition, broccoli is an all-star food with many health benefits. While low in calories, broccoli is rich in essential vitamins and minerals, in addition to fiber.

Broccoli belongs to a family of vegetables called cruciferous vegetables and its close relatives include brussel sprouts, cauliflower, and cabbage. Broccoli contains sulforophane, a sulfur-containing compound present in cruciferous vegetables. Researchers are studying the anti-cancer properties of sulforophane and have come to some interesting conclusions, although more research is needed.

As if that’s not enough, a cup of cooked broccoli offers as much vitamin C as an orange, and is a good source of beta-carotene. Broccoli contains vitamins B1, B2, B3, B6, iron, magnesium, potassium, and zinc too. It also provides fiber and is low in calories.

Broccoli Nutrients

Broccoli is a great source of vitamins K and C, a good source of folate (folic acid) and also provides potassium, fiber.

Vitamin K – essential for the functioning of many proteins involved in blood clotting

Vitamin C – builds collagen, which forms body tissue and bone, and helps cuts and wounds heal. Vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant and protects the body from damaging free radicals.

Fiber – diets high in fiber promote digestive health. A high fiber intake can also help lower cholesterol.

Potassium – a mineral and electrolyte that is essential for the function of nerves and heart contraction.

Folate – is necessary for the production and maintenance of new cells in the body.

broccoli casseroleCooking with Broccoli

Cooking methods can impact the nutrient content and health benefits of broccoli. Boiling can leach up to 90% of the valuable nutrients from broccoli, while steaming, roasting, stir-frying, and microwaving tends to preserve the nutrients.

History of Broccoli

Broccoli was developed from wild cabbage during Roman times, and was enjoyed immensely by the Romans. Broccoli was introduced to the United States during colonial times, but did not gain popularity until the 1920’s.

Did you know?

Broccoli gets its name from the Italian word “broccolo”, which means “cabbage sprout”.

Try this!

Looking for a new way to enjoy broccoli? Try roasting it! Place fresh broccoli on a metal sheet lined with aluminum foil and spray with cooking spray. Sprinkle a pinch of salt and some Parmesan cheese. Roast the broccoli at 450 degrees for 15 minutes. The broccoli will have a deliciously nutty taste that will have you craving more

1122 Spring Cypress Spring TX 77373

whole grain

whole grain is a grain of any cereal and pseudocereal that contains the endospermgerm, and bran, in contrast to refined grains, which retain only the endosperm.

As part of a general healthy diet, consumption of whole grains is associated with lower risk of several diseases.Whole grains are a source of carbohydrates, multiple nutrients and dietary fiber.Cereals proteins have low quality, due to deficiencies in essential amino acids, mainly lysine. In contrast, the proteins of the pseudocereals have a high nutritional value.

In a small part of the general population, gluten – proteins found in wheat and related grains– can trigger coeliac diseasenon-coeliac gluten sensitivitygluten ataxia and dermatitis herpetiformis.

Whole grains are a source of multiple nutrients and dietary fiber, recommended for children and adults in several daily servings containing a variety of foods that meet whole grain-rich criteria.

By supplying high dietary fiber content, as part of a general healthy diet, consumption of whole grains is associated with lower risk of several diseases, including coronary heart diseasestrokecancer and type 2 diabetes, with lower all-cause mortality.[4][14][15] Regular whole-grain consumption lowers LDL and triglyceride levels, which contributes to an overall 26% reduction in coronary heart disease-risk factors. In addition, whole-grain consumption is inversely related to hypertensiondiabetes, and obesity when compared to refined grains, all of which are negative indicators in total cardiovascular health.

As components of breakfast cereals, whole grains are associated with improved micronutrient intake and lower risk of several diseases.Their effects on gastrointestinal health, risk of obesity and cognition need further evaluation.

Keeping grains as close to their original form as possible slows or prevents the digestion of starch, and a slower digestion is responsible for preventing spikes in blood sugar (over time spikes in blood sugar may lead to insulin resistance).

Cereals proteins have low quality, due to deficiencies in essential amino acids, mainly lysine. Supplementation of cereals with proteins from other food sources (mainly legumes) is commonly used to compensate for this deficiency, since the limitation of a single essential amino acid causes the others to break down and become excreted, which is especially important during the period of growth. In contrast, the proteins of the pseudocereals have a high nutritional value, close to those of casein (the main protein in milk). Quinoa and amaranth are the most nutritious grains due to their high content and quality of proteins, with high levels of lysine and other essential amino acids. Minor cereals and pseudocereals are a good alternative to replace gluten-containing cereals, for people who need to follow a gluten-free diet.

Manufacturers of foods containing whole grains in specified amounts are allowed a health claim for marketing purposes in the United States, stating: “low fat diets rich in fiber-containing grain products, fruits, and vegetables may reduce the risk of some types of cancer, a disease associated with many factors” and “diets low in saturated fat and cholesterol and rich in fruits, vegetables, and grain products that contain some types of dietary fiber, particularly soluble fiber, may reduce the risk of heart disease, a disease associated with many factors”. The scientific opinion of the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) related to health claims on gut health/bowel function, weight control, blood glucose/insulin levels, weight management, blood cholesterol, satiety, glycaemic index, digestive function and cardiovascular health is “that the food constituent, whole grain, (…) is not sufficiently characterised in relation to the claimed health effects” and “that a cause and effect relationship cannot be established between the consumption of whole grain and the claimed effects considered in this opinion

Diabetes

What is Diabetes?


Diabetes can strike anyone, from any walk of life.

And it does – in numbers that are dramatically increasing. In the last decade, the cases of people living with diabetes jumped almost 50 percent – to more than 30 million Americans. Worldwide, it afflicts more than 422 million people.

Diabetes is a leading cause of blindness, kidney failure, amputations, heart failure and stroke.

Living with diabetes places an enormous emotional, physical and financial burden on the entire family. Annually, diabetes costs the American public more than $245 billion.

Just what is diabetes?

To answer that, you first need to understand the role of insulin in your body.  When you eat, your body turns food into sugars, or glucose. At that point, your pancreas is supposed to release insulin.  Insulin serves as a “key” to open your cells, to allow the glucose to enter — and allow you to use the glucose for energy.

But with diabetes, this system does not work.

Several major things can go wrong – causing the onset of diabetes. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes are the most common forms of the disease, but there are also other kinds, such as gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy, as well as other forms.

Do you want to learn more about the basics of diabetes? Read our brochure: “What is Diabetes?” in English or “¿Que es La Diabetes?” in Spanish.

What is Type 1 Diabetes?

The more severe form of diabetes is type 1, or insulin-dependent diabetes. It’s sometimes called “juvenile” diabetes, because type 1 diabetes usually develops in children and teenagers, though it can develop at any age.

What is diabetes? This illustration shows the pancreas and insulin, with insulin represented as the ‘key’ that ‘opens’ cells, allowing blood glucose to enter, and allowing body to use the glucose for energy

Immune System Attacks

With type 1 diabetes, the body’s immune system attacks part of its own pancreas. Scientists are not sure why. But the immune system mistakenly sees the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas as foreign, and destroys them. This attack is known as “autoimmune” disease.

These cells – called “islets” (pronounced EYE-lets) – are the ones that sense glucose in the blood and, in response, produce the necessary amount of insulin to normalize blood sugars.

Insulin serves as a “key” to open your cells, to allow the glucose to enter — and allow you to use the glucose for energy.  Without insulin, there is no “key.”   So, the sugar stays — and builds up– in the blood. The result: the body’s cells starve from the lack of glucose.  And, if left untreated, the high level of “blood sugar” can damage eyes, kidneys, nerves, and the heart, and can also lead to coma and death.

Insulin Therapy

So, a person with type 1 treats the disease by taking insulin injections. This outside source of insulin now serves as the “key” — bringing glucose to the body’s cells.

The challenge with this treatment is that it’s often not possible to know precisely how much insulin to take. The amount is based on many factors, including:

•Food

•Exercise

•Stress

•Emotions and general health

Balancing Act

These factors fluctuate greatly throughout every day. So, deciding on what dose of insulin to take is a complicated balancing act.

If you take too much, then your body burns too much glucose — and your blood sugar can drop to a dangerously low level. This is a condition called hypoglycemia, which, if untreated, can be potentially life-threatening.

If you take too little insulin, your body can again be starved of the energy it needs, and your blood sugar can rise to a dangerously high level — a condition called hyperglycemia. This also increases the chance of long-term complications.

What is Type 2 Diabetes?

The most common form of diabetes is called type 2, or non-insulin dependent diabetes.

This is also called “adult onset” diabetes, since it typically develops after age 35. However, a growing number of younger people are now developing type 2 diabetes.

People with type 2 are able to produce some of their own insulin. Often, it’s not enough. And sometimes, the insulin will try to serve as the “key” to open the body’s cells, to allow the glucose to enter. But the key won’t work. The cells won’t open. This is called insulin resistance.

Often, type 2 is tied to people who are overweight, with a sedentary lifestyle.

Treatment focuses on diet and exercise. If blood sugar levels are still high, oral medications are used to help the body use its own insulin more efficiently. In some cases, insulin injections are necessary.

baking soda

Baking soda uses - Dr. AxeWhat is baking soda used for? Baking soda uses are plentiful to say the least. Many of us think of baking soda as just an ingredient for baking or something that helps to keep our refrigerators odor-free, but baking soda is incredibly good for your health and your entire home, too! If you haven’t used baking soda for cleaning, get ready to be pretty amazed. Baking soda beauty uses? Yes, there are many!Talk about an affordable natural remedy, a box of baking soda typically costs a dollar or even less. Baking soda has been used since ancient times as a deodorizer, soother and cleanser. Baking soda uses range from basic daily hygiene (think toothpaste and shampoo) to baking soda health benefits including digestive issues and even kidney problems.

Let’s take a look at all of baking soda’s super impressive benefits and baking soda uses, but first what is baking soda?


What Is Baking Soda?

Baking soda is a familiar household product that also goes by the names sodium bicarbonate, bicarbonate of soda and sodium hydrogen carbonate. The baking soda chemical formula aka the sodium bicarbonate formula is NaHCO3. This baking soda formula represents its composition of of sodium ions and bicarbonate ions. It’s a substance known for its alkalizing effects thanks to a baking soda ph of 9.

What is sodium bicarbonate? In its most natural form sodium bicarbonate is also known as nahcolite, a mineral that is found in various locations around the world. It is commercially mined in areas of California, Colorado, Botswana and Kenya. There are also large deposits in Mexico, Uganda, Turkey and Mexico.

Some people get confused with baking soda vs. baking powder. Baking soda is a chemical leavening agent and so is baking powder, which means that when used in baking both baking soda and baking powder cause batters to rise. Throughout history, baking soda has been used as a rising agent when baking. It’s 100 percent sodium bicarbonate; so when mixed with acid, baking soda makes bubbles and gives off a carbon dioxide gas, causing the dough to rise. Baking powder and baking soda are similar yet different since baking powder is made up of sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) and one or multiple acid salts.


6 Health Benefits of Baking Soda

Baking soda is a great tool for cleaning and removing stains, but there are many health benefits associated with the use of baking soda, too. Sodium bicarbonate is sometimes used as a supplement because it provides dietary bicarbonate. When taken orally, baking soda can raise serum levels of bicarbonate.

What is bicarbonate? Bicarbonate is typically made by the kidneys, and it acts as an acid buffer in the body. Some of the most common baking soda uses for health include:

1. Helps with Digestive Issues

Baking soda is known to help to neutralize acid and improve pH balance in the body. Baking soda is often used internally to quell digestive dismay such as acid reflux or heartburn. When these complaints are due to overconsumption of acidic foods or a generally acidic state of the body, slowly drinking some baking soda in water can help to neutralize the acid and get your body’s pH back to a better place.

Don’t think more is better when it comes to taking baking soda. It’s important to note that consuming too much baking soda can cause an increase in acid production.

2. Anti-Fungal and Antibacterial

Baking soda has been shown to kill off bacteria including Streptococcus mutans, which is a type of bacteria associated with tooth decay.  Baking soda is also effective against various fungal groups including yeasts, dermatophytes and molds that cause skin and nail infections in humans.

3. Boost Kidney Health

Research reveals that baking uses include the promotion of kidney health. A clinical study published in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology looked at the effects of sodium bicarbonate on 134 patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and low blood bicarbonate levels.

What did they find? The subjects who supplemented with bicarbonate tolerated it well and were significantly less likely to experience rapid progression of their kidney disease. Additionally, there were less patients that developed end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the bicarbonate group compared to the control group. Overall, the researchers conclude, “This study demonstrates that bicarbonate supplementation slows the rate of progression of renal failure to ESRD and improves nutritional status among patients with CKD.”

4. Alleviate Urinary Tract Infections

According to the CDC, urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common infections and as Mayo Clinic points out, women have a higher risk of developing a UTI than men.

A scientific study published in 2017 looked at the effects of baking soda on female patients with lower urinary tract symptoms who also had acidic urine pH levels lower than six. After four weeks of taking baking soda orally, the researchers found the urine of the subjects was alkalinized and there was a “a significant level of positive effects on symptoms and symptom scores.”

Overall, baking soda appears to be an easy, inexpensive way to improve UTI symptoms accompanied by acidic urine with little to no unwanted side effects.

5. Reduce Muscle Pain and Fatigue

A scientific article published in 2013, titled “Practical considerations for bicarbonate loading and sports performance,” points out that studies to date have demonstrated that taking sodium bicarbonate before exercise (also known as bicarbonate loading) may have “a moderate positive effect” on athletic performance that includes one to seven minutes of sustained strenuous exercise. In addition, sodium bicarbonate may also be helpful for prolonged physical activity involving intermittent or sustained periods of high-intensity training.

So is there a benefit to using baking soda as a training aid? According to the author of the article, Dr. Louise Mary Burke, “It could be useful to try and support the training session to allow the athlete to train harder, but also to reduce some of the negative side effects of having a high acidity in the muscle so you may get less damage to the muscle and a better training outcome in the long-term.”

Another small clinical study of eight healthy male subjects found consuming baking soda before intermittent cycling improved their sprint performance.

6. Help Alleviate Chemotherapy Side Effects

Chemotherapy side effects as make the list of baking soda uses for health. If you or someone you know has gone through chemotherapy, then you probably already know how bad the side effects of this cancer treatment can be. For example, undesirable changes to the mouth and throat can occur in some patients.

Rinsing with a baking soda mixture daily can help to improve these unwanted side effects. Combine a fourth of a teaspoon of baking soda, an eighth of a teaspoon of sea salt with one cup of warm and rinse your mouth three times per day. Each time, follow the baking soda salt mixture with a rinse of just plain warm water.

These are just some of the many possible health benefits of baking soda! In the following section, you’ll learn about even more health uses and benefits of this amazing natural remedy.


Top 33 Ways to Use Baking Soda Today

Baking Soda Uses – Natural Beauty and Skin

1. Natural Deodorant – Create your own deodorant by mixing a teaspoon of baking soda with enough water to create a milky baking soda paste, then rub it under your underarms or even on your feet.

2. Face Exfoliator – Remove dry skin from your face by creating your own baking soda exfoliant. Combine one teaspoon of baking soda with half a cup of water and rub it on your face in a circular motion, then rinse. Using baking soda for face exfoliation is an inexpensive way to refine skin, just don’t use baking soda too frequently because you don’t want it to upset the pH balance of your skin.

3. Hand Softener – To scrub away dirt and odors, mix baking soda with warm water and rub it on your hands. This natural hand cleanser will leave your hands clean and soft.

4. Foot Soother – Create your own foot bath with a tablespoon of baking soda and warm water. This baking soda bath will remove bacteria and odors and can help to prevent toenail fungus.

5. Itchy Skin Relief – Baking soda can help to reduce discomfort from sunburn, allergic rashes, and skin affected by poison ivy or poison oak. Mix a teaspoon with some water to create a baking soda paste and apply it to the areas of concern. Leave it on for several minutes and then rinse. You can do this a few times per day as needed.

6. Splinter Removal – Splinters will come out naturally after a few days of soaking it in baking soda (use a mix that includes a tablespoon of baking soda and warm water). Soak the affected area twice a day in the baking soda water.

7. Bug Bite Soother – Rub baking soda on your bug bite to relieve the itching. Create a paste with a teaspoon of baking soda and water. Keep applying the soda paste – about three times a day – until the bite dissipates.

8. Sunburn Relief – Your fragile sunburned skin will benefit from soaking in a mixture of baking soda and water. Soak in a warm (not hot) bath that includes half a cup of baking soda. You can also mix baking soda into your favorite body lotion to calm a sunburn.


Baking Soda Uses – Hair and Teeth

9. Hair Cleanser – Baking soda for hair? Yes! Simply add a teaspoon of baking soda to your shampoo, rub it into your hair and rinse as usual. Baking soda shampoo is ultra clarifying so it’s a great way to remove dirt and oil as well as residue that is left over from hair products.

10. Brush and Comb Cleaner – You don’t want to use harmful chemicals to clean your hair tools so try baking soda instead! Take advantage of this baking soda benefit by creating a paste by combining two teaspoons of baking soda with one cup of water. Coat your brushes and combs with this paste and then rinse thoroughly.

11. Homemade Toothpaste – Baking soda toothpaste is a great way to improve dental health. Baking soda is known to increase plaque removal — that is why it’s commonly used in both conventional and natural toothpaste. Straight baking soda has abrasive qualities, and over time it may wear away enamel. Instead, to keep fresh breath, you can add baking soda to your toothpaste, make your own homemade toothpaste, or just dip your toothbrush in baking soda a few times a week.

12. Teeth Whitener – Baking soda uses for dental health continue! To keep your teeth looking pearly white, create your own paste with a teaspoon of baking soda and water. Once a week, rub the paste onto your teeth, let it sit for five minutes, and then rinse your mouth. This is such a great natural way to whiten your teeth and kill bacteria without any harsh and questionable chemicals.


Baking Soda Uses – Health

13. Heartburn and Indigestion Relief – Baking soda for heartburn is really a thing, so much so that conventional manufacturers of conventional heartburn medications include sodium bicarbonate in their formulates. Baking soda is a cost-effective way to reduce heartburn and indigestion, as opposed to other options like Tums and Rolaids, which also contain bicarbonate. Simply add half a teaspoon of baking soda to two cups of water. An hour after eating, drink this mixture to gain some relief.

14. Cancer Prevention – When you have a pH imbalance, unhealthy organisms are able to flourish, which damages tissues and organs, and compromises the immune system. Baking soda is known to increase the pH of acidic tumors without affecting the pH balance of healthy tissues and the blood. Scientific research has demonstrated that oral doses of sodium bicarbonate can raise tumor pH and inhibit spontaneous metastases in animal models of metastatic breast cancer.

15. Exercise Enhancer – Baking soda benefits can carry over to your exercise routine too. Soaking in a warm warm with a half cup of baking soda added is said to help neutralize lactic acid build up in the muscles after a workout. Some studies, as I mentioned earlier, also point towards its internal use to reduce fatigue post-workout. It also may enhance athletic performance when consumed prior to physical activity.

16. Improve Kidney Function – As an alkaline substance, baking soda buffers acids in the body and helps to keep pH levels balanced. Low-functioning kidneys have a hard time removing acid from the body, so consuming baking soda can help with just that and some research has shown it may slow the progress of chronic kidney disease.

17. Reduce Ulcer Pain – Because baking soda neutralizes stomach acid, it can helpful for ulcers. Speak with your doctor first, but taking baking soda in water internally may help relieve ulcer symptoms.


Baking Soda Uses – Home

18. Natural Kitchen Scrub – Sprinkle baking soda on the surfaces in your kitchen and use a sponge or rag to scrub. You can even add a few drops of lemon, lavender or peppermint essential oil to add a natural fragrance to this DIY cleaning product.

19. Pots and Pans Cleaner – Baking soda can be used to hand wash pots and pans, and it won’t hurt these valuables either. Just let them soak in baking soda for 15 to 20 minutes … the grease, grim or food will come right off!

20. Carpet Cleaner – Many carpet cleaners include chemicals that can be harmful to your pets or children, so use baking soda to give your carpet a good cleaning and neutralize odors. Sprinkle your carpet with baking soda; let it sit for 15 to 20 minutes, and then vacuum.

21. Gentle Baby Clothes Cleanser – Baking soda can be used as a natural cleanser, detergent booster and even a fabric softener. It’s the perfect way to clean baby clothes — just add one cup to your load of laundry.

22. Fruit and Veggie Scrub – Make your own natural scrub by adding a teaspoon of baking soda to water. The pasty mixture is a perfect way to remove bacteria from your fruits and veggies.

23. Silverware Cleaner – Create a paste that is three parts baking soda and one part water. Rub the paste onto your silverware and let it sit in a large tray or bowl. After 15 to 20 minutes, rinse the silverware.

24. Oven Cleaner – Don’t use harmful chemicals to clean your oven; instead, just add a teaspoon of baking soda to a damp sponge or rag. This combination will wipe away food and grease easily.

25. Drain Cleaner – Mix baking soda and vinegar to create your own drain cleaner. A vinegar and baking soda mixture is a much safer option than the harmful chemicals that are typically used to clear drains. Let the combination bubble for 15 minutes, then rinse with hot water. Just wait until you see how effective baking soda and vinegar cleaning can be!

26. Dish-Washer Helper – Want to test out if baking soda cleaning your dishes is really a thing? Add baking soda to your regular dish washing cycle; this will help to eliminate unwanted grease and grime that builds up on your dishes.

27. Fire Extinguisher – If you experience a minor grease fire in your kitchen, you can use baking soda to extinguish it. Pouring baking soda on a small pan fire shouldl stifle the flames quickly.

28. Shoe Deodorizer – Can’t get that unpleasant smell out of your shoes? Shoe deodorize is yet another one of the many common baking soda uses. Sprinkle baking soda inside your shoes to deodorize them. You’ll see how that foul odor clears up within minutes.

29. Coffee and Tea Pot Cleaner – To remove coffee stains and funky tastes from your coffee or tea pot, make this quick mixture: one-fourth cup of baking soda with one quart of warm water. Rub the mixture on and in your pots; if you are battling tough stains, let it sit for a few hours first and then rinse.

30. Shower-Curtain Cleaner – Get rid of those stains that show up on shower curtains by rubbing baking soda onto them. Add a little water and the grime will be gone shortly.

31. Closet Freshener – To freshen your closet, place a box or cup of baking soda inside. Periodically change the baking soda to keep your closet smelling fresh and clean.

32. Wash Your Car – Ever hear of a baking soda car wash? Because baking soda easily removes grease and dirt, it’s the perfect ingredient for the ultimate car cleaning. Create a paste with one-fourth cup of baking soda with one cup of warm water. With a sponge or rag, rub the paste onto your car (tires, lights, seats, windows) and then rinse. Or dilute in a gallon of water to remove dirt and grime off your paint as well — just make sure to thoroughly dissolve as baking soda is abrasive in its powdered state.

33. Kitty-Litter Deodorizer – There are baking soda uses for pets too! To naturally deodorize your cat box, cover the bottom of the box with baking soda first, and then fill it in with kitty litter as usual. After cleaning out the liter, give the box some extra deodorization by sprinkling baking soda on top.


Recommended Dosages for Baking Soda

Cold and Flu Relief

Baking soda uses historically include natural treatment of the common cold and flu as well. Recommended dosages from the Arm and Hammer Company for colds and influenza date back to 1925. The company broke the doses up into a three-day period:

Day 1: The first day consists of six doses of a half-teaspoon of baking soda in a glass of cool water, at about two-hour intervals.

Day 2: On the second day, the company advises that the individual take four doses of a half-teaspoon of baking soda in a glass of cool water, at the same intervals.

Day 3: The third day includes two doses of a half-teaspoon of baking soda in a glass of cool water, morning and evening, and thereafter a half-teaspoon of baking soda in a glass of cool water each morning until the cold or flu symptoms are cured.

Indigestion

To calm an episode of indigestion, a common dosage recommendation is adding a fourth of a teaspoon of baking soda to a glass of water. This can help to reduce stomach acid, but it’s important to remember that not all indigestion is caused by an overproduction of acid so if you still have symptoms two weeks later, speak to your doctor.

It’s always best to slowly sip a baking soda and water mixture. When taking baking soda internally AVOID:

  • Taking a baking soda and water mixture in which the baking soda is not fully dissolved
  • Taking more than 3.5 teaspoons of baking soda in a given day
  • Taking more than 1.5 teaspoon a day if you’re over 60 years old
  • Taking the maximum dosage for longer than two weeks
  • Drinking baking soda solution too quickly
  • Taking baking soda when you’re overly full (to avoid gastric rupture)

Baking Soda Precautions & Potential Side Effects

Baking soda uses for skin or body are generally considered safe and nontoxic. Consuming baking soda orally is also safe, but don’t exceed the recommended dose. Too much baking soda can upset the body’s acid-base balance leading to nausea, vomiting and/or abdominal pain. Rare cases of baking soda overdose lead to seizures, coma and death.

Baking soda is high in sodium — 1,259 milligrams in one teaspoon — so high doses are not safe. High doses can raise blood pressure and cause swelling. In severe cases, it can overload circulation and lead to heart failure. People who consume too much baking soda have reportedly developed blood chemistry imbalances and heart malfunction (ineffective pumping).

Another reason not to overdo your consumption of baking soda is that it can increase potassium excretion which could lead to a potassium deficiency.

If you have edema, liver disease, kidney disease or high blood pressure, you should avoid taking baking soda internally. You should also refrain from consuming baking soda if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.

If you are on prescription drugs, consult your doctor before consuming baking soda, and make sure you speak to your doctor about drinking baking soda if you are on a sodium-restricted diet.

You should not take baking soda within two hours of taking other medications. It’s also not recommended to give baking soda to children under six years of age unless directed by your pediatrician.

If you are using baking soda to treat a medical condition, and it has been more than two weeks, it’s a good idea to see your doctor to be sure that you can continue self-medicating.

Some products that may interact with baking soda include aspirin and other salicylates, barbiturates, calcium supplements, corticosteroids, medications with a special coating to protect the stomach, lithium, quinidine, and diuretics.

Speak with your doctor before using sodium bicarbonate if you are currently taking any medications or have any ongoing health concerns.


Final Thoughts

For such a low cost, this is one really affordable natural remedy with a seemingly endless lists of baking soda uses. From cleaning your bathroom or cleaning your face to calming indigestion and even providing a workout boost, all of the many baking soda uses are pretty amazing.

Of course, as with all good things, you don’t want to overdo it topically or internally because while many people struggle with being too acidic, not all of us have that problem and overdoing baking soda can increase acidity.

Sodium carbonate is highly alkalizing substance that when used correctly has been shown to help kidney, urinary and digestive health concerns. Even if you’re not interested in internal or topical baking soda uses, I highly recommend it as one of the best things to have around your home for some really effective yet non toxic cleaning. thanks to DR.AXE.

 

Eggs

Eggs are a very good source of inexpensive, high quality protein. More than half theprotein of an egg is found in the egg white along with vitamin B2 and lower amounts of fat and cholesterol than the yolk. The whites are rich sources of selenium, vitamin D, B6, B12 and minerals such as zinciron and copper.

1. Whole Eggs Are Among the Most Nutritious Foods on Earth
6 Reasons Why Eggs Are the Healthiest Food on the Planet

One whole egg contains an amazing range of nutrients.

In fact, the nutrients in there are enough to turn a single fertilized cell into an entire baby chicken.

Eggs are loaded with vitamins, minerals, high-quality protein, good fats and various other lesser-known nutrients.

One large egg contains (1):

  • Vitamin B12 (cobalamin): 9% of the RDA
  • Vitamin B2 (riboflavin): 15% of the RDA
  • Vitamin A: 6% of the RDA
  • Vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid): 7% of the RDA
  • Selenium: 22% of the RDA
  • Eggs also contain small amounts of almost every vitamin and mineral required by the human body, including calcium, iron, potassium, zinc, manganese, vitamin E, folate and many more.

A large egg contains 77 calories, with 6 grams of quality protein, 5 grams of fat and trace amounts of carbohydrates.

It’s very important to realize that almost all the nutrients are contained in the yolk, the white contains only protein.

SUMMARYWhole eggs are incredibly nutritious, containing a very large amount of nutrients compared to calories. The nutrients are found in the yolks, while the whites are mostly protein.

2. Eggs Improve Your Cholesterol Profile and do NOT Raise Your Risk of Heart Disease

The main reason people have been warned about eggs is that they’re loaded with cholesterol.

One large egg contains 212 mg of cholesterol, which is a lot compared to most other foods.

However, dietary sources of cholesterol have a minimal effect on cholesterol levels in the blood (2).

Your liver actually produces cholesterol, every single day. The amount produced depends on how much you eat.

If you get a lot of cholesterol from food, your liver produces less. If you don’t eat cholesterol, your liver produces more of it.

The thing is, many studies show that eggs actually improve your cholesterol profile.

They raise HDL (the “good”) cholesterol and they tend to change the LDL (the “bad”) cholesterol to a large subtype which is not as strongly associated with an increased risk of heart disease (345).

Multiple studies have examined how eating eggs affects the risk of heart disease and found no association between the two (678).

On the contrary, eggs have been linked with health benefits.

One study discovered that eating 3 whole eggs per day reduced insulin resistance, raised HDL and increased the size of LDL particles in people with metabolic syndrome (9).

However, some studies do show an increased risk of heart disease in people with diabetes. This needs further research though and probably doesn’t apply to a low-carb diet, which can, in many cases, reverse type 2 diabetes (101112).

SUMMARYStudies show that eggs actually improve the cholesterol profile. They raise HDL (good) cholesterol and increase the size of LDL particles, which should lower the risk of heart disease.

3. Eggs Are Loaded With Choline, an Important Nutrient for the Brain

Choline is a lesser-known nutrient that is often grouped with the B-complex vitamins.

Choline is an essential nutrient for human health and is needed for various processes in the body.

It is required to synthesize the neurotransmitter acetylcholine and is also a component of cell membranes.

A low choline intake has been implicated in liver diseases, heart disease and neurological disorders (13).

This nutrient may be especially important for pregnant women. Studies show that a low choline intake can raise the risk of neural tube defects and lead to decreased cognitive function in the baby (14).

Many people do not get enough choline. As an example, one study in pregnant, Canadian women found that only 23% reached the adequate intake of choline (15).

The best sources of choline in the diet are egg yolks and beef liver. One large egg contains 113 mg of choline.

SUMMARYCholine is an essential nutrient that few people get enough of. Egg yolks are an excellent source of choline.

4. Eggs Contain High-Quality Proteins With a Perfect Amino Acid Profile

Proteins are the main building blocks of the body and serve both structural and functional purposes.

They consist of amino acids that are linked together, kind of like beads on a string, and then folded into complex shapes.

There are about 21 amino acids that your body uses to build its proteins.

Nine of these cannot be produced by the body and have to be obtained from the diet. They are known as essential amino acids.

The quality of a protein source is determined by its relative amounts of these essential amino acids. A protein source that contains all of them in the right ratios is a high-quality source of protein.

Eggs are among the best sources of protein in the diet. In fact, the biological value (a measure of protein quality) is often evaluated by comparing it to eggs, which are given the perfect score of 100 (16).

SUMMARYEggs are an excellent source of protein, with all the essential amino acids in the right ratios.

5. Eggs Are Loaded With Lutein and Zeaxanthin, Which Protect the Eyes

There are two antioxidants in eggs that can have powerful protective effects on the eyes.

They are called lutein and zeaxanthin, both found in the yolk.

Lutein and zeaxanthin tend to accumulate in the retina, the sensory part of the eye, where they protect the eyes from harmful sunlight (17).

These antioxidants significantly reduce the risk of macular degeneration and cataracts, which are among the leading causes of vision impairment and blindness in the elderly (181920).

In one study, eating 1.3 egg yolks per day for 4.5 weeks increased blood levels of zeaxanthin by 114–142% and lutein by 28–50% (21).

SUMMARYEggs are very high in the antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin, which can drastically reduce the risk of macular degeneration and cataracts.

6. Eggs for Breakfast Can Help You Lose Body Fat

Eggs contain only trace amounts of carbohydrates, but plenty of protein and fat.

They score very high on a scale called the satiety index, which is a measure of how much foods contribute to satiety (8).

For this reason, it is not surprising to see studies showing that eating eggs for breakfast may lead to fat loss.

In one study, 30 overweight or obese women consumed a breakfast of either eggs or bagels. Both breakfasts had the same amount of calories.

The women in the egg group felt more full and ate fewer calories for the rest of the day and for the next 36 hours (22).

In another study that went on for 8 weeks, eating eggs for breakfast led to significant weight loss compared to the same amount of calories from bagels. The egg group (23):

  • Lost 65% more body weight.
  • Lost 16% more body fat.
  • Had a 61% greater reduction in BMI.
  • Had a 34% greater reduction in waist circumference (a good marker for the dangerous belly fat).

SUMMARYEggs are very satiating. As a result, eating eggs for breakfast may reduce calorie intake later in the day and promote fat loss.

Not All Eggs Are the Same

It’s important to keep in mind that not all eggs are created equal.

Hens are often raised in factories, caged and fed grain-based feed that alters the final nutrient composition of their eggs. It is best to buy omega-3 enriched or pastured eggs, which are more nutritious and healthier.

However, conventional supermarket eggs are still a good choice if you can’t afford or access the others.