Dachshund – Part 2

Characteristics

Appearance

A wire-haired dachshund

A typical dachshund is long-bodied and muscular with short stubby legs. Its front paws are disproportionately large, being paddle-shaped and particularly suitable for digging. Its skin is loose enough not to tear while tunneling in tight burrows to chase prey. The dachshund has a deep chest which provides appropriate lung capacity for stamina when hunting. Its snout is long. According to the AKC standards for the breed, “scars from honorable wounds shall not be considered a fault” because the dachshund is a hunting dog.

Coat and color

A redhaired miniature dachshund

There are three dachshund coat varieties: smooth coat (short hair), long haired, and wire haired. Long haired dachshunds have a silky coat and short feathering on legs and ears. Wire haired dachshunds are the least common coat variety in the United States (although it is the most common in Germany) and the most recent coat to appear in breeding standards. Dachshunds have a wide variety of colors and patterns, the most common one being red. Their base coloration can be single-colored (either red or cream), tan pointed (black and tan, chocolate and tan, blue and tan, or isabella and tan), and in wire haired dogs, a color referred to as wild boar. Patterns such as dapple (merle), sable, brindle and piebald also can occur on any of the base colors. Dachshunds in the same litter may be born in different coat colors depending on the genetic makeup of the parents. The dominant color in the breed is red, followed by black and tan. Tan pointed dogs have tan (or cream) markings over the eyes, ears, paws, and tail. The reds range from coppers to deep rusts, with or without somewhat common black hairs peppered along the back, face and ear edges, lending much character and an almost burnished appearance; this is referred to among breeders and enthusiasts as an “overlay” or “sabling”. Sabling should not be confused with a more unusual coat color referred to as sable. At a distance, a sable dachshund looks somewhat like a black and tan dog. Upon closer examination, however, one can observe that along the top of the dog’s body, each hair is actually banded with red at the base near the skin transitioning to mostly black along the length of the strand. An additional striking coat marking is the brindle pattern. “Brindle” refers to dark stripes over a solid background—usually red. If a dachshund is brindled on a dark coat and has tan points, it will have brindling on the tan points only. Even one single, lone stripe of brindle is a brindle. If a dachshund has one single spot of dapple, it is a dapple.

The Dachshund Club of America (DCA) and the American Kennel Club (AKC) consider both the piebald pattern and the double dapple (double merle) pattern to be nonstandard. However, both types continue to be shown and sometimes even win in the conformation ring.

Dogs that are double-dappled have the merle pattern of a dapple, but with distinct white patches that occur when the dapple gene expresses itself twice in the same area of the coat. The DCA excluded the wording “double-dapple” from the standard in 2007 and now strictly uses the wording “dapple” as the double dapple gene is commonly responsible for blindness and deafness.

There are three types of dachshund, which can be classified by their coats: short-haired, called ‘smooth’; long-haired; and wire-haired.

Long Haired Dachshund

More about these cute little dogs in Part 3.

(Information from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia )