Dachshund – Part 1

The dachshund, also known as the sausage dog or wiener dog is a short-legged, long-bodied, hound-type dog breed. They may be smooth-haired, wire-haired, or long-haired.

The standard-size dachshund was developed to scent, chase, and flush out badgers and other burrow-dwelling animals, while the miniature dachshund was bred to hunt smaller prey such as rabbits. In the Western United States, they have also been used to track wounded deer and hunt prairie dogs.

Dachshunds also participate in conformation shows, field trials and many other events organized through pure-bred dog organizations such as the American Kennel Club (AKC). According to the AKC, the dachshund is ranked in 13th place in popularity among dog breeds in the United States.

The name dachshund is of German origin and literally means “badger dog,” from Dachs (“European badger”) and Hund (“hound, dog”). The pronunciation varies widely in English: variations of the first and second syllables include /ˈdɑːks-/, /ˈdæks-/ and /-hʊnt/, /-hʊnd/, /-ənd/. Although “dachshund” is a German word, in modern German they are more commonly known by the short name Dackel or Teckel. The German word is pronounced [ˈdaks.hʊnt].

Because of their long, narrow build, they are often nicknamed wiener dog or sausage dog. Dachshund may be mispronounced as “dash-hound” by some English speakers.

Classification

While classified in the hound group or scent hound group in the United States and Great Britain, the breed has its own group in the countries which belong to the Fédération Cynologique Internationale (World Canine Federation). Many dachshunds, especially the wire-haired subtype, may exhibit behavior and appearance that are similar to that of the terrier group of dogs. An argument can be made for the scent (or hound) group classification because the breed was developed to use scent to trail and hunt animals, and probably descended from the Saint Hubert Hound like many modern scent hound breeds such as bloodhounds and Basset Hounds; but with the persistent personality and love for digging that probably developed from the terrier, it can also be argued that they could belong in the terrier, or “earth dog”, group.

More about these popular and cute little dogs, nicknamed “wiener dogs” in Part 2.

(Information from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)