History Of The New York Times

In 1852, the newspaper started a western division, The Times of California, which arrived whenever a mail boat from New York docked in California. However, the effort failed once local California newspapers came into prominence.

On September 14, 1857, the newspaper officially shortened its name to The NewYork Times. (The hyphen in the city name was dropped on December 1, 1896.) On April 21, 1861, The New York Times began publishing a Sunday edition to offer daily coverage of the Civil War. One of the earliest public controversies it was involved with was the Mortara Affair, the subject of twenty editorials in the Times alone.

The main office of The New York Times was attacked during the New York City Draft Riots. The riots, sparked by the beginning of drafting for the Union Army, began on July 13, 1863. On “Newspaper Row”, across from City Hall, Henry Raymond stopped the rioters with Gatling guns, early machine guns, one of which he manned himself. The mob diverted, instead of attacking the headquarters of abolitionist publisher Horace Greeley’s New York Tribune until being forced to flee by the Brooklyn City Police, who had crossed the East River to help the Manhattan authorities.

In 1869, Henry Raymond died, and George Jones took over as publisher.

The newspaper’s influence grew in 1870 and 1871, when it published a series of exposés on William Tweed, leader of the city’s Democratic Party—popularly known as “Tammany Hall” (from its early 19th century meeting headquarters)—that led to the end of the Tweed Ring’s domination of New York’s City Hall.[34] Tweed had offered The New York Times five million dollars (equivalent to more than 100 million dollars today) to not publish the story.

In the 1880s, The New York Times gradually transitioned from supporting Republican Party candidates in its editorials to becoming more politically independent and analytical. In 1884, the paper supported Democrat Grover Cleveland (former Mayor of Buffalo and Governor of New York State) in his first presidential campaign. While this move cost The New York Times a portion of its readership among its more progressive and Republican readers (revenue declined from $188,000 to $56,000 from 1883-1884), the paper eventually regained most of its lost ground within a few years.

(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_New_York_Times)