U.S. Abortion Foes Say Christine Blasey Ford Should Be Heard

Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh, who is scheduled to appear again before the Senate Judiciary Committee next week, leaves his Chevy Chase, Maryland, home Wednesday. (Win McNamee via Getty Images)
Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh, who is scheduled to appear again before the Senate Judiciary Committee next week, leaves his Chevy Chase, Maryland, home Wednesday. (Win McNamee via Getty Images)

Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh’s confirmation to the U.S. Supreme Court could give the anti-abortion movement a clear path to dismantle Roe v. Wade, the 1973 decision that legalized abortion nationwide. Professor Christine Blasey Ford’s allegation that Kavanaugh sexually assaulted her when they were high school students has the potential to jeopardize Kavanaugh’s confirmation. But that doesn’t mean all abortion rights foes are entirely dismissing her. HuffPost reached out to members of the movement. Here’s what they had to say:

Jennifer Christie, anti-abortion speaker from Virginia

I became pregnant after a brutal sexual assault by a stranger 4½ years ago. There was not a question of abortion. It didn’t occur to [my husband and me]. Everyone’s telling you you’re crazy, this is a monster’s baby. That’s not the way it feels.

I think there’s a lot of concern — at least in the community that I work with —  that Judge Kavanaugh won’t do anything to overturn Roe v. WadeI’m holding off on judging completely, but I’m cynical.

I don’t think that a woman claiming sexual assault should ever be dismissed. I think Ford needs to be heard. That’s the bottom line. And Kavanaugh also needs to have an opportunity for a fair trial.

We’re always accused of inventing stories or trying to bring people down, so I would never say that about another woman. But also, as the mother of four sons, I worry all it takes is an allegation and their lives are over.

Unfortunately, a lot of people are like, “well, why did Ford wait so many years?” I don’t think that’s a credible argument at all. It’s incredibly difficult for a woman to come forward about something like this.

I’d like to think, as a movement, we are not jumping to side with Kavanaugh or dismissing a woman’s allegation. In my circles, we’re just waiting to see. We want justice to be served.

Rebecca Kiessling, president of Save The 1

I believe that she needs to have an opportunity to be heard but disappointed to hear she won’t testify on Monday. [The accuser, who goes by Christine Blasey professionally, said through attorneys that she wants the FBI to investigate before testifying.] I was definitely concerned there could have been a potential for blocking a nomination because of an anonymous allegation. That’s not our system of justice.

I’m torn, because I’ve always said how important it is to give rape victims the benefit of the doubt. My own dear mother was a rape victim. My biological father was never convicted. But, in my situation, my mother told people right away. She told family members, friends, she went to the police, it’s in my adoption records. I know there are situations where women bury it and don’t say anything for years …. I know that’s really, really common.

I feel for women who have held this secret for so many years. It’s not easy. We’ll see what happens during the committee hearing, whether she’ll ultimately be willing to testify. I understand that’s going to be difficult, but you can’t expect to block a Supreme Court nomination with anonymous allegations.